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TedX Livermore/ Flickr Creative Commons

New Silicon Valley Rep. Ro Khanna told Axios in a recent taping for the C-SPAN program "The Communicators" that his fellow Democrats should be wary of what he sees as a bad deal on a bill to protect net neutrality:

"I think the Democrats are pragmatic. I don't think that they're going to fall on their sword if there's a legitimate compromise. But a lot of times, these things sound good and then when you look back and you peel the onion they're just giveaways to corporations. So, we have to see what the actual details will look like."

Why this matters: A key question in the upcoming net neutrality battle is whether congressional Democrats will come to the table for a compromise bill. Such a bill could bar broadband providers from blocking or throttling content or allowing fast lanes, but would not treat providers as a utility and therefore scale back the FCC's new broad authority over the industry. That concession may go too far for some Democrats.

FWIW: Khanna says he thinks the broadband service should be treated like a utility, as the current FCC rules do, but said he doesn't want to comment on a legislative compromise that doesn't exist or "let the perfect be the enemy of the good."

What's next: Senate Commerce Committee chairman John Thune has said he expects Democrats to take some time to weigh their options. Plus, Thune and his House counterpart Greg Walden may wait for the FCC to act on dismantling the net neutrality rules the agency approved in 2015. New FCC Chair Ajit Pai confirmed opposition to the current rules, but declined to lay out a roadmap for agency action.

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
11 mins ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.

Trump political team disavows "Patriot Party" groups

Marine One carries President Trump away from the White House on Inauguration Day. Photo: Patrick Smith/Getty Images

Donald Trump's still-active presidential campaign committee officially disavowed political groups affiliated with the nascent "Patriot Party" on Monday.

Why it matters: Trump briefly floated the possibility of creating a new political party to compete with the GOP — with him at the helm. But others have formed their own "Patriot Party" entities during the past week, and Trump's team wants to make clear it has nothing to do with them.