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Protestors hold ISIS flags while making gestures during a protest in Srinagar, India. Photo: Idrees Abbas/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

A judge ruled Thursday that Hoda Muthana, a 24-year-old Alabama woman who traveled to Syria in November 2014 to join ISIS, is not a U.S. citizen because her Tunisian father had diplomatic status in the U.S. when she was born, BuzzFeed News reports.

Why it matters: The U.S. government has no obligation to help Mothana return to the U.S. Muthana expressed interest in returning to the U.S. earlier this year while being detained in a Kurdish refugee camp with her 2-year-old son, the Guardian reports.

Background: The lawsuit concerning Muthana's citizenship is centered around her father's diplomatic status for the Yemeni government at the time of her birth.

  • Muthana said she was born in Hackensack, New Jersey, in 1994, and traveled to Syria with her U.S. passport.
  • But the government argues she should never have been considered a citizen in the first place, NBC News reports.
  • Children of foreign diplomats based in the U.S. are excluded from birthright citizenship, which is outlined in the 14th Amendment.
  • In February, President Trump said he had instructed Secretary of State Mike Pompeo not to allow Muthana back into the country.

The big picture: Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told reporters Tuesday that if governments continued to pressure Turkey with sanctions, he's going to release detainees thought to be members of the Islamic State and send them back to their home countries, the New York Times reports.

  • In an interview with NBC News this week, Muthana says she now rejects the extremist ideology of ISIS and should be allowed to return home.

Go deeper ... Women and jihad: From bride to the front line

Go deeper

U.S. grants temporary protected status to thousands of Venezuelans

Venezuelan citizens participate in the vote for the popular consultation in December 2020, as part of a protest against Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro in Doral, Florida. Photo: Chandan Khanna/AFP

Venezuelans living in the United States will be eligible to receive temporary protected status for 18 months, the Department of Homeland Security announced Monday.

Why it matters: Tens of thousands of Venezuelans have fled to the U.S. amid economic, political and social turmoil back home. Former President Trump, on his last full day in office, granted some protections to Venezuelans through the U.S. Deferred Enforced Departure program, but advocates and lawmakers said the move didn't go far enough.

"She-cession" threatens economic recovery

Illustration: Sarah Grillo

Decades of the slow economic progress women made catching up to men evaporated in just one year.

Why it matters: As quickly as those gains were erased, it could take much, much longer for them to return — a warning Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen issued today.

The Week America Changed

Sandberg thought Zuckerberg was "nuts" on remote work in January 2020

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Paul Marotta/Getty Image

Chief operating officer Sheryl Sandberg thought Mark Zuckerberg was "nuts" when he raised the possibility in January 2020 that 50,000 Facebook employees might have to work from home. By March 6, they were.

Why it matters: In an interview Monday with Axios Re:Cap, Sandberg explained how Facebook moved quickly to respond to the pandemic with grants for small businesses and work-from-home stipends for its employees, and how the company has been watching the unfolding crisis for women in the workforce.

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