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A federal judge in San Francisco has blocked part of President Trump's Jan. 25 executive order that would allow the administration to cut off funding to so-called sanctuary cities that don't cooperate with the feds over illegal immigration.

In blocking the order, Judge William Orrick III ruled that constitutional challenges were likely to be upheld:

"The Order has caused budget uncertainty by threatening to deprive the Counties of hundreds of millions of dollars in federal grants that support core services in their jurisdictions....Given the nationwide scope of the Order, and its apparent constitutional flaws, a nationwide injunction is appropriate."

Why it matters: The ruling is temporary and can be appealed, but it's a setback in Trump's efforts to ramp up immigration enforcement and comes as the White House tries to demonstrate the "remarkable" progress Trump has made in implementing his agenda ahead of the 100-day mark.

Go deeper

Mayors plan multifront attack on census shutdown

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

A growing number of mayors are banding together to fight what they consider to be an inaccurate and abruptly curtailed 2020 census, using an arsenal of legal, legislative and congressional efforts.

Why it matters: The outcome may determine whether President Trump or Joe Biden controls the redistricting process, which governs everything from congressional representation and redistricting to funding for schools and Head Start.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Chris Christie: Wear a mask "or you may regret it — as I did" — Senate Democrats block vote on McConnell's targeted relief bill.
  2. Business: New state unemployment filings fall.
  3. Economy: Why the stimulus delay isn't a crisis (yet).
  4. Health: Many U.S. deaths were avoidable — The pandemic is getting worse again.
  5. Education: Boston and Chicago send students back home for online learning.
  6. World: Spain and France exceed 1 million cases.
3 hours ago - Technology

Facebook Oversight Board begins hearing appeals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The Facebook Oversight Board announced Thursday that some Facebook and Instagram users can now submit appeals to the Oversight Board for an independent review of their own content removals.

Why it matters: The board, a first-of-its-kind internet governance body, will begin hearing cases from users ahead of the U.S. election.

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