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Jessica Alba's Honest Co. slashes its valuation

Illustration: Sam Jayne / Axios

The Honest Company, the all-natural home goods company co-founded by Jessica Alba, is raising $75 million in new venture capital funding at a much lower valuation than the last time around, according to a document filed last week with Delaware regulators.

Top-line details: Honest's new round would be Series E stock priced at around $19.60 per share, which is 57% lower than the price of its Series D shares (sold in the summer of 2015). It also would slash the Los Angeles-based company's valuation from around $1.7 billion to below $1 billion. An Honest Co. spokeswoman declined comment.

Caveat: The Delaware document (uncovered by CBInsights) is only a share authorization, not an indication that the shares have necessarily been sold. A venture capitalist not previously involved with Honest told Axios that he had seen the deal, but it's also possible that it would be done only by insiders.

Fundraising history: Honest Co. has raised over $220 million in funding since 2001, from firms like General Catalyst, Lightspeed Venture Partners, Institutional Venture Partners, Fidelity, Wellington Management and Hartford Financial.

Context: Honest Co. was floated last year as a possible acquisition target of Unilever, which was seeking inroads into both the "green" household goods market and direct-to-consumer channel. But that disappeared once Unilever instead agreed to buy both Seventh Generation (for between $600m-$700m) and Dollar Shave Club (for $1 billion). Earlier this year, Honest Co. co-founder Brian Lee stepped down as CEO, following a controversy over certain product ingredients, and was replaced by former Clorox executive Nick Vlahos.

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D.C.'s March for our Lives: "The voters are coming"

Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives.
Protestor at D.C.'s March for our Lives. Photo: Axios' Stef Kight.

D.C.'s March for our Lives event is expected to see more than half a million participants.

Why it matters: While D.C. is the primary march, there are hundreds of others around the world and across the country. Led by students, the march is "to demand that a comprehensive and effective bill be immediately brought before Congress to address" gun issues, per the organization's mission statement.

Haley Britzky 4 hours ago
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DOJ eyeing tool to allow access to encrypted data on smartphones

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein.
Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein. Photo: Win McNamee / Getty Images

The Justice Department is in "a preliminary stage" of discussions about requiring tech companies building "tools into smartphones and other devices" that would allow law enforcement investigators to access encrypted data, the New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This has been on the FBI's mind since 2010, and last month the White House "circulated a memo...outlining ways to think about solving the problem," officials told the Times. Both FBI Director Christopher Wray, and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, support finding ways for law enforcement to access data without compromising devices security.