Bezos at Amazon Smbhav in New Delhi on Jan. 15. Photo: Sajjad Hussain/AFP via Getty Images

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos announced the launch of his "Earth Fund" on Monday via Instagram to fund climate change research and awareness.

What he's saying: Bezos says he's initially committing $10 billion to fund "scientists, activists, and NGOS" that are working on environmental preservation and protection efforts.

  • "I want to work alongside others both to amplify known ways and to explore new ways of fighting the devastating impact of climate change on this planet we all share," Bezos' Instagram post reads.
  • He says he'll start issuing grants this summer.

Details: That $10 billion comes from Bezos' personal money and none of the funds will be used in for-profit enterprises, investing in private companies or startups, a person familiar with the fund told Axios.

This big picture, per Axios' Ben Geman: The new fund is the latest example of tech companies or their billionaire founders devoting more resources to climate change. 

  • Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates has worked on climate for years through the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, and via Breakthrough Energy Ventures, a fund Bezos also invests in that stakes clean energy startups.
  • And last month when Microsoft rolled out its pledge to become “carbon negative” by 2030, it announced a new fund to invest $1 billion over four years to accelerate development and use of carbon reduction and removal technologies.

Go deeper: Amazon and Big Tech can't escape climate pressure

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

This week, United Airlines warned 36,000 U.S. employees their jobs were at risk, Walgreens cut more than 4,000 jobs, Wells Fargo announced it was preparing thousands of terminations this year, and Levi's axed 700 jobs due to falling sales.

Why it matters: We have entered round two of the jobs apocalypse. Those announcements followed similar ones from the Hilton, Hyatt, Marriott and Choice hotels, which all have announced thousands of job cuts, and the bankruptcies of more major U.S. companies like 24 Hour Fitness, Brooks Brothers and Chuck E. Cheese in recent days.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

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The big picture: The Justice Department, the Federal Trade Commission and the states have multiple investigations of monopolistic behavior underway targeting Facebook and Google, with other giants like Amazon and Apple also facing rising scrutiny. Many observers expect a lawsuit against Google to land this summer.

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Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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He moves slower than they want, sides with liberals more than they want, and trims his sails in ways they find maddening. But he is still deeply and unmistakably conservative, pulling the law to the right — at his own pace and in his own image.