Jared Kushner speaking to reporters outside the White House. Photo: Alex Brandon/AP

Jared Kushner, President Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, is registered to vote as female, Wired reports. That's not the first time Kushner put inaccurate information on an official form.

  • He initially filled out a federal disclosure form needed to obtain a security clearance with no foreign contacts listed, according to CBS. The Washington Post reports that the form also "got the dates of his graduate degrees and his father-in-law's address wrong."
  • Kushner then filled out the form a second time, detailing "more than 100 calls or meetings" with foreign contacts, per WaPo.
  • The third time Kushner filed the form, it included the meeting he attended with Donald Trump Jr., Paul Manafort and a Russian lawyer during the 2016 campaign, per CBS.
  • Kushner filed a second personal financial disclosure form, according to the Wall Street Journal, after the initial filing "inadvertently omitted" 77 assets including real estate, bonds and a personal art collection.
  • He was fined for filing his financial disclosure statement late.
  • Kushner was registered to vote in both New Jersey and New York, according to The Hill.

Update: The female voter registration is the result of an error by the New York Board of Elections.

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