The Pueblo County Detention Center in Colorado. Photo: Aaron Ontiveroz/The Denver Post via Getty Images

When the U.S. started shutting down large institutional mental health hospitals in the 1960s — facilities that had become infamous for their poor conditions and subpar treatment — they didn't actually stop institutionalizing people with mental illness. They just started doing it in jails and prisons instead.

The big picture: Nearly half of the roughly 740,000 people being held in American jails have been diagnosed with a mental disorder and about a quarter are in "serious psychological distress," according to a new and impressive investigation by the Virginian-Pilot and Marquette University.

  • They’re trying to get a handle, despite subpar data, on mentally ill people who have died in jail. That doesn't include prison — only people who are waiting for a trial.
  • The investigation details several cases in which desperate families turned to the police for help, or a mentally ill person was arrested for a minor crime — driving on a suspended license, stealing from a 7-Eleven, marijuana use — only to end up dead months or even days later.
  • The warning signs were clear. Many of these patients had known mental health histories, often with their families pleading for help. Or the patients had outward signs like smearing feces on the walls.
  • Roughly 40% of the deaths the Pilot tracked happened during or after a stint in solitary confinement, which has been shown to aggravate mental illness. 

The big picture: As the newspaper puts it: "A mental health crisis leads to an arrest, which leads to poor treatment of the illness, which leads to death."

Go deeper: The full piece is worthy of your time.

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Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 12,859,834 — Total deaths: 567,123 — Total recoveries — 7,062,085Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 3,297,501— Total deaths: 135,155 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — NYC reports zero coronavirus deaths for first time since pandemic hit.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

Scoop: How the White House is trying to trap leakers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.

11 GOP congressional nominees support QAnon conspiracy

Lauren Boebert posing in her restaurant in Rifle, Colorado, on April 24. Photo: Emily Kask/AFP

At least 11 Republican congressional nominees have publicly supported or defended the QAnon conspiracy theory movement or some of its tenets — and more aligned with the movement may still find a way onto ballots this year.

Why it matters: Their progress shows how a fringe online forum built on unsubstantiated claims and flagged as a threat by the FBI is seeking a foothold in the U.S. political mainstream.