Italian life Senator Liliana Segre. Photo: Marco Piraccini/Archivio Marco Piraccini/Mondadori/Getty Images

Liliana Segre, an 89-year-old Holocaust survivor and Italian senator-for-life, led the charge to create an anti-hate parliamentary committee after finding herself at the center of nearly 200 daily anti-Semitic attacks, reports AP.

Why it matters: Segre's motion has "provoked one of the country's most intense confrontations with anti-Semitism" since World War II, writes AP. The Italian Parliament approved her motion to create the committee, but it moved forward without a single vote from Italy's right-wing parties.

  • The attacks and threats against Segre have prompted the Italian Interior Ministry to assign her paramilitary police security detail, according to AP.

The big picture: Racial tensions in Italy have been running high recently as some citizens have become bolder in expressing their views, particularly in response to the influx of refugees from Libya.

What they're saying: The leader of the conservative party Brothers of Italy, Giorgia Meloni, said she didn't vote for the motion because it didn't address Islamic extremism and because she's worried it will be used to limit freedom of expression, per AP.

  • Israel's ambassador to Italy tweeted: "An 89-year-old survivor under escort symbolizes the danger that the Jewish communities in Europe are still facing today."

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Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Early voting eclipses 2016 total with 12 days until election

People stand in line to vote early in Fairfax, Virginia in September. Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Americans have cast more than 47.1 million ballots in the 2020 presidential election, surpassing the total early-vote count for 2016 with 12 days left until Election Day, according to a Washington Post analysis of voting data.

Why it matters: The election is already underway, as many states have expanded early and mail-in voting options because of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Trump and Biden at the first debate. Morry Gash-Pool/Getty Image

Watch for President Trump to address Joe Biden as “the big guy” or “the chairman” at tonight's debate as a way of dramatizing the Hunter Biden emails. Hunter's former business partner Tony Bobulinski is expected to be a Trump debate guest.

The big picture: Trump's advisers universally view the first debate as a catastrophe — evidenced by a sharp plunge in Trump’s public and (more convincingly for them) private polling immediately following the debate.