Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sam Jayne / Axios

Shortly after new White House Chief of Staff John Kelly was sworn in this morning, he brought Anthony Scaramucci to his office and told him that he had to go. A source familiar said Kelly needed to assert his influence over the staff, but was gracious in the way he did it.

Mooch was told at 9:30 am this morning. The news didn't leak until early afternoon, when the NYT publicized his departure.What it means, per an administration source: "This was Trump saying to Kelly... 'You have the ball. You make the staff decisions.' In order to assert his authority over the staff, this had to be Kelly's move.'"What we're hearing:A second administration source: "Kelly wanting to turn the page. New culture. Mooch no discipline. Thought he'd burned his credibility."An administration official compared Scaramucci to the "Mr. Wolf" of the administration, the character from Pulp Fiction who solves problems. The official noted that three other people are gone as a result of Scaramucci's tenure: Reince Priebus, Sean Spicer and Michael Short.Jared and Ivanka brought in Scaramucci as an instrument of destruction against Reince Priebus, according to multiple sources. He was used as a tool to end Priebus' tenure in the corner office. A thirdadministration source said Jared and Ivanka have been fully supportive of the general and will follow his lead. They were irritated by Scaramucci's comments to The New Yorker, but from their perspective he served his primary purpose: destroying Reince.Bannon never stopped agitating to get rid of Mooch. A source close to Bannon says he has a good relationship with Kelly, although we can't confirm whether Bannon had actually spoke to Kelly about getting rid of Scaramucci.Remember this: Trump's first reaction to the Scaramucci phone call with The New Yorker was amusement. As Trump saw the negative coverage pile up, he started to get angry. By the next day, he was joking about Mooch, saying things like "What am I going to do with this guy? He's crazy."

One other thought: A number of White House officials thought Mooch's comments to The New Yorker were beyond the pale. One official who is largely forgiving of Trump's behavior told me the President's tacit endorsement of Mooch's lewd comments made him question more seriously than ever before whether this was the kind of place he wanted to work.

Go deeper

In photos: D.C. and U.S. states on alert for pre-inauguration violence

National Guard troops stand behind security fencing with the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building behind them, on Jan. 16. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Security has been stepped up in Washington, D.C., and state capitols across the U.S. as authorities brace for potential violence this weekend.

Driving the news: Following the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol by some supporters of President Trump, the FBI has said there could be armed protests in D.C. and in all 50 state capitols in the run-up to President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration Wednesday.

15 hours ago - Politics & Policy

The new Washington

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Axios subject-matter experts brief you on the incoming administration's plans and team.

Rep. Lou Correa tests positive for COVID-19

Lou Correa. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Rep. Lou Correa (D-Calif.) announced on Saturday that he has tested positive for the coronavirus.

Why it matters: Correa is the latest Democratic lawmaker to share his positive test results after last week's deadly Capitol riot. Correa did not shelter in the designated safe zone with his congressional colleagues during the siege, per a spokesperson, instead staying outside to help Capitol Police.