Photo: Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images

Officials from several oil, power and industrial giants say in a new analysis that there's a cost-effective path to "net-zero" emissions by 2060 from economic sectors that are tricky to decarbonize — like cement, steel, chemicals, heavy trucking and shipping.

Why it matters: While clean power and passenger vehicle tech gets lots of attention, one huge challenge is economically wringing carbon out of what the report calls "harder to abate" areas that account for nearly a third of industrial and energy emissions.

  • "To date, many national strategies — as set out in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) to the Paris agreement — focus little attention on these sectors," the report states.

The big picture: The new report arrives weeks after a major UN-led scientific analysis concluded that to keep warming within 1.5ºC, or 2.7°F, above pre-industrial levels, human-caused CO2 emissions must reach "net zero" by roughly mid-century.

Who they are: The Energy Transitions Commission is a 3-year-old body of executives and officials from roughly 30 entities, including ...

  • Oil majors Shell and BP, and power companies including ENGIE and Vattenfall.
  • Industrial heavyweights like building materials giant Saint-Gobain, water and waste management firm Veolia and Indian conglomerate Dalmia Bharat.
  • Finance sector players HSBC and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.
  • NGOs like the Rocky Mountain Institute, the World Resources Institute and Sustainable Energy for All.

What they found: Getting to net-zero from these "harder to abate" sectors could be done for less than 0.5% of global GDP using largely known technologies, although a number have yet to reach commercial readiness, and more innovation is needed.

Their roadmap is a mix of strategies broadly grouped around energy efficiency gains, reducing demand with steps like better transport logistics, and promoting electrification, hydrogen, sustainable bio-energy and carbon caption.

The intrigue: It won't happen without a bunch of policy shifts, the group said, such as ...

  • CO2 pricing.
  • Investment in R&D and commercialization.
  • Steps to ensure that increased demand for power from electrification is met with clean energy.
  • Public support for infrastructure such as long-distance transmission to enable greater renewables penetration, railways and electric vehicle charging.
  • Green fuels mandates for aviation and shipping.

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Trump tightens screws on ByteDance to sell Tiktok

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Trump added more pressure Friday night on China-based TikTok parent ByteDance to exit the U.S., ordering it to divest all assets related to the U.S. operation of TikTok within 90 days.

Between the lines: The order means ByteDance must be wholly disentangled from TikTok in the U.S. by November. Trump had previously ordered TikTok banned if ByteDance hadn't struck a deal within 45 days. The new order likely means ByteDance has just another 45 days after that to fully close the deal, one White House source told Axios.

Updated 7 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m. ET: 21,056,850 — Total deaths: 762,293— Total recoveries: 13,100,902Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 9:30 p.m ET: 5,306,215 — Total deaths: 168,334 — Total recoveries: 1,796,309 — Total tests: 65,676,624Map.
  3. Health: CDC: Survivors of COVID-19 have up to three months of immunity Fauci believes normalcy will return by "the end of 2021" with vaccine — The pandemic's toll on mental health — FDA releases first-ever list of medical supplies in shortage.
  4. States: California passes 600,000 confirmed coronavirus cases.
  5. Cities: Coronavirus pandemic dims NYC's annual 9/11 Tribute in Light.
  6. Business: How small businesses got stiffed — Unemployment starts moving in the right direction.
  7. Politics: Biden signals fall strategy with new ads.

Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.