Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The Department of Housing and Urban Development proposed a change to its Equal Access Rule on Wednesday that would weaken Obama-era protections for homeless transgender people, allowing HUD-funded shelters to deny people admission on religious grounds or force transgender people to share bathrooms and sleeping quarters.

Why it matters: This is the latest in a string of measures implemented by the Trump administration intended to reduce protections for transgender Americans. An LGBTQ advocate told The Washington Post, it signifies an “escalation of the Trump administration’s broader plan to erase transgender people from federal regulations and legal interpretations."

Details: If approved, the proposed rule would allow shelters to lawfully establish policies to consider an individual’s sex to determine admission, permitting providers to cite factors including “privacy, safety, practical concerns, religious beliefs.”

  • The rule would also give shelters the ability to reject transgender applicants outright or require transgender women to share bathing and sleeping facilities with men.

What's next: The proposal must be published in its entirety and opened for public comment before being finalized as a regulation. The proposal claims HUD will continue “ensuring that its programs are open to all … regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.”

Go deeper: House passes sweeping bill to ban LGBTQ discrimination

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The positions of key GOP senators on replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell talks to reporters on Capitol Hill last Thursday. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

With President Trump planning to nominate his third Supreme Court justice nominee by next week, key Republican senators are indicating their stance on replacing the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg just over six weeks out from Election Day.

The big picture: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) has vowed that "Trump’s nominee will receive a vote on the floor of the United States Senate." But Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska) told Alaska Public Media, "I would not vote to confirm a Supreme Court nominee. We are 50 some days away from an election."

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

ActBlue collects a record $91 million in hours after Ginsburg's death

A makeshift memorial in honor of Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg in front of the U.S. Supreme Court on Sept. 19. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

ActBlue received a record $91.4 million in the 28 hours following Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death, the Democratic donation-processing site confirmed to Axios late Saturday.

Why it matters via the New York Times: "The unprecedented outpouring shows the power of a looming Supreme Court confirmation fight to motivate Democratic donors."

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 30,674,077 — Total deaths: 955,440— Total recoveries: 20,908,811Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 11:30 p.m. ET: 6,764,803 — Total deaths: 199,258 — Total recoveries: 2,577,446 — Total tests: 94,211,463Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: The dwindling chances of eliminating COVID-19.
  5. World: Guatemalan president tests positive for COVID-19 — The countries painting their pandemic recoveries green.