Stories

How the tech industry is responding to the far-right

Steve Helber/AP

Following the violence in Charlottesville this weekend, leading alt-right website The Daily Stormer published an article that suggested the woman who died during the protests was killed during a "road-rage incident" and went on to belittle her appearance. GoDaddy, the internet domain that hosts the alt-right website later kicked them off for violating their terms, The Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: Tech platforms have been criticized by all sides for hosting extremist content. Several, including Facebook and YouTube, have taken steps to crack down on such content, only to be accused by some groups of hampering free speech — underscoring the difficult position platforms find themselves in when it comes to policing users' posts. Alt-right groups have started creating their own platforms that cater to right-wing users with fewer rules, the LA Times reports.

The bigger picture: This is just one of the recent instances of the tech industry pushing back against the far-right.