How states are crafting their own net neutrality rules

A protestor outside the FCC before it voted to repeal net neutrality rules. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

FastCompany's Sean Captain reported Tuesday on the ways that states are trying to establish their own net neutrality rules, after the FCC repealed rules at the federal level.

  • New York legislators are pushing a bill that would require internet providers that work with the state to comply with net neutrality rules.
  • A bill in Washington would ban blocking, throttling and paid "fast lanes" on the internet. The federal rules did the same before they were repealed.
  • Lawmakers in New York and California are also working on additional net neutrality legislation.

Yes, but: The FCC's repeal preempted state action. That could be a challenge to some of these proposals, but critics of the FCC have doubts that preemption is allowed.

Why it matters: The net neutrality debate isn't going away, it's just changing venues. Expect battles at the state level, in the courts as well as the halls of Congress.

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