Feb 14, 2017

Hot in Silicon Valley: Amazon Chime and Apple's all-time high

Amazon has quietly released Chime, a service for making voice and video calls aimed at business users. It directly competes with well-known players like Skype, Google Hangouts, GoToMeeting, Zoom, and Cisco's WebEx, among others. Chime will test Amazon's ability to sell customer-facing applications to business customers.

Apple's share price hits an all-time closing high: The tech giant's stock price hit $133.29 at closing on Monday, a new record for the company fueled by investor hope that the upcoming iPhone's tenth anniversary will renew momentum. Apple's can-do-no-wrong image began to crack in the past couple of years, with concerns that it hasn't released any truly innovative products and a revenue tumble last year.

Go deeper

Husband of deceased Scarborough staffer asks Twitter to delete baseless Trump claims

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The husband of Lori Klausutis, an aide to Joe Scarborough when he was member of Congress who died in 2001, asked Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey to take down President Trump's tweets baselessly accusing the MSNBC host of murdering her, according to a letter obtained by the New York Times' Kara Swisher.

The state of play: Timothy Klausutis asked Dorsey to delete the tweets because Trump "has taken something that does not belong him — the memory of my dead wife and perverted it for perceived political gain."

The polarized pandemic election

A Trump supporter protests Pennsylvania's stay-at-home order, during a May 15 rally outside the Capitol in Harrisburg. Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

President Trump is going all-in on pushing for a rapid, robust return to normal life, creating a visual, visceral contrast with Joe Biden and other Democrats who are more reticent to rip the masks off.

The state of play: Business friends have been urging Trump from the beginning to keep the lockdowns short. He's listening more and more.

Tech's long hot summer of antitrust

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Google, Facebook and other tech giants face a summer of regulatory grilling as long-running investigations into potential anticompetitive practices likely come to a head.

The big picture: Probes into the power of Big Tech launched by federal and state authorities are turning a year old, and observers expect action in the form of formal lawsuits and potentially damning reports — even as the companies have become a lifeline for Americans during the pandemic lockdown.