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Photo: BSIP/UIG via Getty Images

Telehealth startup Hims, a direct-to-consumer brand meant to provide solutions for men to erectile dysfunction and hair loss, launched a sister direct-to-consumer shop called Hers this week to provide women of all ages medical products such as skincare items to combat hair loss and acne, as well as birth control and Addyi, the only FDA-aproved product for hypoactive sexual desire disorder.

Between the lines: Hims doesn’t accept insurance, per The Outline, and neither does Hers, per Forbes, which means the added privacy and convenience of ordering these products from home, skipping the pharmacy line, and a doctor’s visit, comes at a price, literally. For women in particular, this added cost could be prohibitive to jumping on board since birth control is free or low-cost with most insurance.

What they're saying: It’s not always possible for all women to take off work to see a doctor, and Hilary Coles, the brand lead on the Hers launch, told Forbes the company is trying to put "the power back into women’s hands" to boost access.

By the numbers: The global telehealth market should reach $19.5 billion by 2025, according to Fast Company citing Transparency Market Research.

  • Women will pay Hers between $15-$100 a month, and specifically for a monthly supply of birth control will cough up about $30, per Forbes.

Hers centralizes what a smattering of other direct-to-consumer companies offer in their own niches. Hers may become a countervailing force against businesses like birth control startups such as Nurx, Maven, and The Pill Club, as well as skincare and beauty companies like Curology and Glossier.

The big picture: The timing of several of these startups' launches is about patent expiration, per The Outline. After Bayer Pharmaceuticals’ patent for Yaz, an oral birth control pill, expired in 2014, many other companies started selling their own generic versions and several online pharmaceutical-driven shops started popping up concurrently.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Photo: SOPA Images / Contributor

Facebook said late Thursday that a mix of "technical problems" and confusion among advertisers around its new political ad ban rules caused issues affecting ad campaigns of both parties.

Why it matters: A report out Thursday morning suggested the ad tools were causing campaign ads, even those that adhered to Facebook's new rules, to be paused. Very quickly, political campaigners began asserting the tech giant was enforcing policies in a way that was biased against their campaigns.

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Operation Warp Speed has an Achilles' heel: States need billions to distribute vaccines — and many say they don't have the cash.

Why it matters: The first emergency use authorization could come as soon as next month, but vaccines require funding for workers, shipping and handling, and for reserving spaces for vaccination sites.