Expand chart
Data: Venrock survey of 250 health care professionals conducted March 4–15, 2019; Chart: Naema Ahmed / Axios

Venture capital firm Venrock, which has money tied up in more than 80 health care companies, has put out its annual survey of health care professionals, and most people are pretty upbeat about where health tech is going this year.

Driving the news: 78% of Venrock’s survey respondents said they thought the number of new health IT companies will "somewhat" or "significantly" increase this year — and a lot of that growth will be in telemedicine and harvesting patient data.

Yes, but: It’s not all sunshine and rainbows.

  • Half of respondents think the Apple Watch is just another consumer commodity instead of a useful health care device.
  • 36% believe Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway and JPMorgan Chase "have no idea what they’re getting into" with their health company Haven, while another 55% think "it’s gonna be a long haul" for them.
  • Half of people think AI hasn’t made any difference in health care.
  • And a vast majority said blockchain will still be useless in 2019.

Go deeper: Americans have big hopes that Big Tech can improve health care

Go deeper

1 hour ago - Health

The top-selling drugs in the U.S. in 2019

Data: IQVIA, company financial documents; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The 10 highest-selling drugs in the U.S. last year gave away more than $23 billion in rebates to insurance intermediaries, but still netted almost $58 billion in sales.

The big picture: The U.S. drug pricing system is filled with confusing numbers, and many entities profit off the flow of drugs, but pharmaceutical companies retain a vast majority of the proceeds.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
2 hours ago - Health

America's flying blind on its coronavirus response

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

A month after the Trump administration changed how hospital data is reported, the public release of this data "has slowed to a crawl," the Wall Street Journal reports.

The big picture: This is the latest example of how the world's wealthiest country just can't get it together.

Updated 3 hours ago - World

Pandemic plunges U.K. into "largest recession on record"

The scene near the Royal Exchange and the Bank of England in the City of London, England. Photo: Tolga Akmen/AFP via Getty Images

The United Kingdom slumped into recession as its gross domestic product GDP shrank 20.4% compared with the first three months of the year, the Office of National Statistics (ONS) confirmed Wednesday.

Why it matters: Per an ONS statement, "It is clear that the U.K. is in the largest recession on record." The U.K. has faired worse than any other major European economy from coronavirus lockdowns, Bloomberg notes. And finance minister Rishi Sunak warns the situation is likely to worsen.