Health care companies are big fans of the GOP tax reform. Photo: Bryan R. Smith / AFP via Getty

Health care companies at the J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference in San Francisco are drooling over the financial windfalls they expect to reap from the Republican tax overhaul signed into law before Christmas.

Between the lines: Health care firms — many of which have a vast majority of their business in the U.S., if not all of it — expect to see billions of dollars in corporate tax savings. Companies plan on using that money to pay down debt, buy back stock or acquire competitors — not to funnel higher wages back to workers.

What we're hearing: Tax reform was the topic on the top of most analysts' and investors' minds on the first day of the conference. Here's what a handful of health care executives said.

  • Cardinal Health: The tax changes are "important and positive for us," said Jorge Gomez, the chief financial officer of the drug and device distributor. The elimination of the manufacturing deduction offsets some of the benefit of the lower corporate tax rate, but Cardinal Health is "really excited" about the long-term effects, Gomez said.
  • Express Scripts: The pharmacy benefit manager expects $850 million in corporate tax savings. "We will not be sitting on that cash, I can promise you that," CEO Tim Wentworth said. (Translation: mergers and acquisitions, with no mention of higher worker wages.)
  • Abbott Laboratories: Even though Abbott already has an effective tax rate of 16.5%, lower than the new rate of 21%, the company still likes the new floor and expects to pay down more debt immediately. "What we like about tax reform is the flexibility it is going to provide to us," CFO Brian Yoor said. "It's not unfavorable to Abbott."
  • Pharmaceutical companies large and small view the tax overhaul as a major win for their industry.

Go deeper

Updated 31 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 30,241,377 — Total deaths: 947,266— Total recoveries: 20,575,416Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12 p.m. ET: 6,681,251 — Total deaths: 197,763 — Total recoveries: 2,540,334 — Total tests: 91,546,598Map.
  3. Politics: Trump vs. his own administration on virus response.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.
33 mins ago - Economy & Business

Anxious days for airline workers as mass layoffs loom

Sara Nelson, president of the Association of Flight Attendants, during a Sept. 9 protest outside the Capitol. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The clock is ticking for tens of thousands of anxious airline employees, who face mass reductions when the government's current payroll support program expires on Sept. 30.

Where it stands: Airline CEOs met Thursday with White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, who said President Trump would support an additional $25 billion from Congress to extend the current aid package through next March.

House Democrats ask DOJ watchdog to probe Durham's Trump-Russia investigation

Attorney General Bill Barr. Photo: Kamil Krzaczynsky/AFP via Getty Images

Four Democratic House committee chairs on Friday asked the Justice Department's inspector general to launch an "emergency investigation" into whether Attorney General Bill Barr and U.S. Attorney John Durham, his appointee, are taking actions that could "improperly influence the upcoming presidential election."

Catch up quick: Last year, Barr tapped Durham to conduct a sweeping investigation into the origins of the FBI's 2016 Russia probe, after he and President Trump claimed that it was unjustified and a "hoax."