Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With legislation in Congress likely to be blocked by partisan division and interest group opposition, much of the real action in health care this year will be in the states.

The big picture: States don’t have the money or purchasing power the federal government does, but their decisions nevertheless affect millions of people, and they could signal the future of federal reform.

What to watch: Colorado and Washington are implementing public insurance options that could be a model for Democrats at the federal level.

  • Both plans would be privately administered, and would pay providers 160% of Medicare rates, or more.
  • It’s not yet clear whether they’d be open to very many people with employer-based coverage, or how many providers will accept this coverage.
  • Pennsylvania and New Jersey are taking over their Affordable Care Act marketplaces from the federal government.
  • California is embarking on an ambitious state-financed coverage expansion.

State interest in Massachusetts-like cost controls may grow, as could interest in using Medicaid to pay for non-medical services for high cost patients, as North Carolina is doing.

The other side: Idaho and other red states are promoting short-term insurance plans as an alternative to the Affordable Care Act.

  • Georgia is seeking ACA waiver plan to ditch the state’s marketplace, with consumers enrolling through insurers and web brokers, and a subsidy scheme allowing healthier consumers to choose skimpier plans that do not meet all ACA standards. 
  • Tennessee is seeking a form of per capita cap within Medicaid, with broad flexibility and favorable terms for the state.
  • Red states’ efforts to implement work requirements for Medicaid appear to be faltering in the face of adverse court decisions and opposition. But the Trump administration is still approving them.

Go deeper

Biden: The next president should decide on Ginsburg’s replacement

Joe Biden. Photo: Drew Angerer / Getty Images

Joe Biden is calling for the winner of November's presidential election to select Ruth Bader Ginsburg's replacement on the Supreme Court.

What he's saying: "[L]et me be clear: The voters should pick the president and the president should pick the justice for the Senate to consider," Biden said. "This was the position the Republican Senate took in 2016 when there were almost 10 months to go before the election. That's the position the United States Senate must take today, and the election's only 46 days off.

Trump, McConnell to move fast to replace Ginsburg

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump will move within days to nominate his third Supreme Court justice in just three-plus short years — and shape the court for literally decades to come, top Republican sources tell Axios.

Driving the news: Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Senate Republicans are ready to move to confirm Trump's nominee before Election Day, just 46 days away, setting up one of the most consequential periods of our lifetimes, the sources say.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 30,393,591 — Total deaths: 950,344— Total recoveries: 20,679,272Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 p.m. ET: 6,722,699 — Total deaths: 198,484 — Total recoveries: 2,556,465 — Total tests: 92,163,649Map.
  3. Politics: In reversal, CDC again recommends coronavirus testing for asymptomatic people.
  4. Health: Massive USPS face mask operation called off The risks of moving too fast on a vaccine.
  5. Business: Unemployment drop-off reverses course 1 million mortgage-holders fall through safety netHow the pandemic has deepened Boeing's 737 MAX crunch.
  6. Education: At least 42% of school employees are vulnerable.