AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File

Hampton Creek, the meatless food startup that has raised more than $220 million in VC funding, made news earlier this week by basically losing its entire board (save for founder and CEO Josh Tetrick). Six notes:

1. Top-line: This is what happens when a CEO has super-voting rights and no longer really listens to his board. In fact, it's unclear why companies with such structure even have boards of directors, rather than boards of advisors. The late Bill Campbell said that the only real job of a board is to hire and fire a CEO, so boards like Hampton Creek don't really have a core function. Nonetheless, Tetrick does plan to reconstitute it with new people.

2. It wasn't always this way: Tetrick didn't get super-voting rights until its most recent financing round, which valued the company at around $800 million post-money.

3. Notable: My initial reaction was that this was the board using its only actual means of protest, which is to quit (something that some argued earlier this year was what Uber's board should have done). But if this is a protest, it's pretty deeply undercut by a statement that the ex-directors "continue to fully support Hampton Creek and its CEO Josh in their exciting and important mission to change the food industry for the better of all people. We will advise Josh and the team on strategies across all areas of its business moving forward."

4. Disclaimer: Hampton Creek is best known for its egg-less mayo. I hate mayo (including that fancier-sounding aioli — you're not fooling anyone). So I'm not as reflexively supportive of the company's mission.

5. Timing: The departures didn't all come at once. Horizons Ventures rep Bart Swanson left months ago. Another board member was asked by Tetrick to resign in June after a reported corporate coupthat resulted in the firings of three executives.

6. Investor rep: Among the three others was Khosla Ventures partner Samir Kaul, who was the board's only remaining investor rep. Khosla Ventures still has its seat, although no word on if it plans to name a new representative.

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Finally, a real debate

Photo: Morry Gash/AP

A more disciplined President Trump held back from the rowdy interruptions at tonight's debate in Nashville, while making some assertions so outlandish that Joe Biden chuckled and even closed his eyes.

  • A Trump campaign adviser told Axios: "He finally listened." 

The result: A real debate.

  • With a firm moderator, NBC News' Kristen Welker — along with threats of mic cutoffs and advisers' pleas for Trump to cool it — voters finally heard clear contrasts.
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Between the lines: Trump didn't focus on assuring women voters or seniors. But his economic argument could reassure some men in swing states.

  • Trump went back to 2016 mode — the outsider, chiding career politicians. But he's one of them now.

During an exchange about race in America, Trump said: "Nobody has done more for the black community than Donald Trump, with the exception of Abraham Lincoln — possible exception. ... I'm the least racist person in this room."

  • Biden retorted sarcastically, referring to Trump: "Abraham Lincoln here is one of the most racist presidents we’ve had in modern history."

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