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New polling shows that three quarters of the public believes global temperatures have been rising in recent decades, including a growing share of Republicans, but a wide partisan gap on climate change persists.

Expand chart
Data: Pew Research Center; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

Why it matters: The new Pew Research Center data offers a snapshot of Americans' views at a time when the White House is moving aggressively to dismantle Obama-era climate change policies.

A few takeaways from the big Pew poll conducted over the summer and released Thursday . . .

  • Increasing belief: The 74% who agree there is "solid evidence" of warming is the highest level in Pew's polling since 2007, and well above the 61 percent share in their early 2014 poll.
  • Big party split remains: The new poll shows that 92 percent of Democrats say Earth's average temperatures have climbed in recent decades, compared to 52 percent of GOP respondents.
  • Upward GOP trend: The 52 percent of Republicans who believe there is solid evidence of warming is above the 39 percent in 2014, but remains below where it was a decade ago.

Yes, but: The same poll shows that when asked about environmental regulations (though not climate rules specifically), 36 percent of Republicans said stricter regulations are worth the cost, well below the 58 percent who agreed with that view a decade ago.

Reality check: On climate, the data shows that most Republicans polled remain out of step with the overwhelming view among scientists that human activities, like burning fossil fuels and deforestation, have been the primary cause of warming since the mid-20th century.

Pew found that 24 percent of Republicans polled believe both that there's global warming and that it's caused mostly by humans, while in contrast nearly eight in 10 Democrats agree on the human influence.

Go deeper

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Rahm Emanuel floated for Transportation secretary

Rahm Emanuel. Photo: Joshua Lott for The Washington Post via Getty Images

President-elect Biden is strongly considering Rahm Emanuel to run the Department of Transportation, weighing the former Chicago mayor’s experience on infrastructure spending against concerns from progressives over his policing record.

Why it matters: The DOT could effectively become the new Commerce Department, as infrastructure spending, smart cities construction and the rollout of drone-delivery programs take on increasing economic weight.

6 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Biden turns to experienced hands for White House economic team

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Joe Biden plans to announce Cecilia Rouse and Brian Deese as part of his economic team and Neera Tanden to head the Office of Management and Budget, sources tell Axios.

Why it matters: These are experienced hands. Unveiling a diverse group of advisers also may draw attention away from a selection of Deese to run the National Economic Council. Some progressives have criticized his work at BlackRock, the world's largest asset management firm.

Biden taps former Obama communications director for press secretary

Photo: Mark Makela/Getty Images

Jen Psaki, who previously served as Obama's communications director, will serve as President-elect Joe Biden's press secretary, the transition team announced Sunday.

The big picture: All of the top aides in Biden's communication staff will be women, per the Washington Post, which first reported Psaki's appointment.

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