May 10, 2019

The state of the Green New Deal

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Expand chart
Data: Reproduced from a Yale Program on Climate Change Communication report; Chart: Axios Visuals

A pair of new polls underscore the Green New Deal's fast rise to political prominence and hint at how it could factor into the 2020 elections.

Why it matters: The separate surveys unveiled yesterday provide a fresh look at opinion ahead of a high-profile moment for the sweeping lefty climate and jobs plan.

  • On Monday Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez will headline a Washington, D.C. rally organized by the youth-led Sunrise Movement.
  • Sunrise will "announce a nationwide campaign to make the 2020 election a referendum on the Green New Deal," an advisory states.

By the numbers: A Yale and George Mason University survey shows that political views of the Green New Deal have splintered along partisan lines as its name recognition has increased.

  • 58% of registered voters had heard either "a little" or "a lot" about the Green New Deal in their survey conducted last month, up from 17% in December.
  • Check out the chart above: GOP voters have turned sharply against the proposal while Democratic support remains robust.
  • The growing GOP opposition comes after months of attacks from Republican lawmakers and conservative movement figures.

The intrigue: "[S]upport for the Green New Deal is lower among Republicans who watch Fox News more frequently than it is among Republicans who watch it less often," the report notes.

  • The April survey showed support for the Green New Deal at just 22% among Republicans who watch Fox more than once per week, compared to 56% among those who watch the network once per week or less.

Now let's turn to a Monmouth University poll of Democratic New Hampshire primary voters released yesterday.

  • 28% of likely voters said it's "very important" that the Democratic Party nominate someone who supports the Green New Deal, while another 36% called it "somewhat" important.
  • More intrigue: Among voters who list it as "very important," 29% back Joe Biden (the clear frontrunner in the poll by a wide margin) and 27% back Bernie Sanders.
  • That's interesting because Sanders backs the Green New Deal while Biden has not weighed in as far as I can tell. Biden is also aggressively courting labor votes and the national AFL-CIO has not gotten behind the Green New Deal.

Go deeper: What Biden and Beto just told us about the 2020 climate fight

Go deeper

14 mins ago - Technology

Trump and Zuckerberg share phone call amid social media furor

Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

In the week that President Trump took on social media, Axios has learned that he had a call Friday with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg that was described by both sides as productive.

Why it matters: With the White House and Twitter at war, Facebook has managed to keep diplomatic relations with the world's most powerful social-media devotee.

Twitter, Google lead chorus of brands backing George Floyd protests

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Twitter and Google are among the dozens of brands over the past 24 hours that have taken public stances in favor of Americans protesting racial equality. Some companies have changed their logos in solidarity with the movement, while others have pledged money in support of efforts to address social injustice.

Why it matters: The pressure that companies feel to speak out on issues has increased during the Trump era, as businesses have sought to fill a trust void left by the government. Now, some of the biggest companies are quickly taking a public stand on the protests, pressuring all other brands to do the same.

NYPD commissioner: "I'm extremely proud" of officers' response to protests

New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea in February. Photo: Yana Paskova/Getty Images

New York City Police Commissioner Dermot Shea said in a public statement Sunday that he is "extremely proud" of the New York City Police Department's response to protests over the death of George Floyd Saturday night, writing: "What we saw in New York City last night and the night before was not about peaceful protest of any kind."

Why it matters: New York City residents captured several instances of police officers using excessive force against demonstrators. In one video, two NYPD SUVs are seen ramming into protesters who were blocking a road and throwing traffic cones at the vehicles.