Photo: Mandel Ngan / AFP / Getty Images

A government shutdown will reduce U.S. GDP in the first quarter of 2018 by upwards of 0.2%—or $6.5 billion—each week it continues, according to Beth Ann Bovino, chief U.S. economist for S&P Global Ratings.

Why it's so costly: Roughly half of the hit results from the lost production of non-essential government workers.

  • After previous shutdowns, Congress has agreed to repay furloughed workers for their lost wages, but the economy did not regain their lost productivity since they were barred from working while the government was closed.

Indirect costs: A shutdown will affect more than just government employees and agencies, Bovino warns.

  • Private contractors who rely on government spending will also be affected. Though they will eventually recover that lost business, they "are going to push off some of their investment ideas or investment plans until they get more certainty," she says.
  • According to a National Association of Government Contractors survey following the 2013 shutdown, 29% of such companies delayed hiring as a result, and it negatively affected 58% of them.
  • Bovino said the closing of national parks and monuments hurts local businesses that rely on tourist traffic.

A higher deficit: Government shutdowns make running the government more expensive. The Office of Management and Budget estimates that the 2013 shutdown raised the budget deficit by at least $2 billion, due to the added costs of stopping and starting government programs.

Go deeper

Trump commutes Roger Stone's sentence

Roger Stone arriving at his sentencing hearing on Feb. 20. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump on Friday evening commuted the sentence of his longtime associate Roger Stone, according to two senior administration officials. Stone in February was sentenced to 40 months in prison for crimes including obstruction, witness tampering and making false statements to Congress.

Why it matters: The controversial move brings an abrupt end to the possibility of Stone spending time behind bars. He had been scheduled to report to prison on July 14.

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Which states have set single-day coronavirus records this week

Data: COVID Tracking Project and state health department data compiled by Axios; Map: Danielle Alberti and Naema Ahmed/Axios

13 states this week surpassed records set just last week for their highest number of coronavirus infections in a single day, according to the COVID Tracking Project and state health department data. 16 states in total reported new highs.

The big picture: The United States' alarming rise in coronavirus cases isn't just due to increased testing — particularly where the number of cases has grown fastest over the last month, Axios' Andrew Witherspoon and Caitlin Owens report.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 12,389,660 — Total deaths: 557,279 — Total recoveries — 6,830,596Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 6:30 p.m. ET: 3,169,611 — Total deaths: 133,885 — Total recoveries: 983,185 — Total tested: 38,856,341Map.
  3. Public health: The reality of the coronavirus bites.
  4. Trade: Trump says he's no longer considering phase-two trade deal with China because the pandemic damaged the two countries' relationship.
  5. 🎧 Podcast: Rural America has its own coronavirus problem.