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Rep. Carlos Curbelo, R-Fla., holds a news conference. Photo: Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call

We've got some details on the upcoming rollout of a GOP lawmaker's carbon tax bill, including the first wave of organizations set to publicly support it.

Driving the news: Republican Rep. Carlos Curbelo of Florida is set to introduce legislation taxing carbon emissions at an event Monday in Washington alongside groups representing environmental and right-leaning libertarian interests, according to multiple people familiar with the plan.

The big picture: Most Republicans in Congress don't publicly acknowledge climate change is a problem, let alone support legislation taxing the carbon emissions fueling it. Curbelo's public stance is notable and may be an early sign of the Republican Party's shift on this traditionally divisive issue.

  • But, the bill is unlikely to gain much support or pass any time soon given deep-seated opposition to carbon taxes by most congressional Republicans and influential right-leaning groups, notably Americans for Tax Reform.

The details: Curbelo's event is set to be held at the National Press Club in downtown Washington, with the Niskanen Center, a libertarian think tank supporting a carbon tax, along with likely at least three environmental groups: The Nature Conservancy, Environmental Defense Fund and World Resources Institute.

  • Comment from these groups were not immediately available. A request to Curbelo’s office wasn’t immediately returned.
  • People close to the bill rollout said plans were still in the works and could change.
  • E&E’s Zack Colman got the scoop earlier this week about the bill’s imminent introduction and its details.
  • Axios has since learned that Curbelo is likely to have at least one, maybe a few more, Republican co-sponsors, but it wasn’t immediately clear which members it would be, according to multiple people following the developments.

What’s next: The House is set to vote Thursday on a non-binding but symbolically important resolution stating that carbon taxes are detrimental to the economy. In a similar vote two years ago, all Republicans voted yes along with a few Democrats.

Between the lines: The timing has got some backers of Curbelo’s bill wondering if House Republican leaders are pushing a vote on the resolution now to undercut Curbelo’s pending bill.

  • That’s not the case, according to spokespeople for House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy and House Majority Whip Steve Scalise, who is sponsoring the resolution, and also a source close to Curbelo backing his bill. All said the timing was purely coincidental.

What we’re watching: Whether Thursday’s vote will have unanimous support from Republicans like it did in 2016. Curbelo already indicated in a tweet he’s likely to vote no, and we’re watching whether other more moderate GOP members follow suit.

Go deeper

DOJ watchdog to probe whether officials sought to alter election results

Former President Donald Trump and former First Lady Melania Trump exit Air Force One in West Palm Beach, Florida, on Jan. 20. Photo: Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

The Justice Department's inspector general will investigate whether any current or former DOJ officials "engaged in an improper attempt to have DOJ seek to alter the outcome" of the 2020 election, the agency announced Monday.

Driving the news: The investigation comes in the wake of a New York Times report that alleged that Jeffrey Clark, the head of DOJ's civil division, had plotted with President Trump to oust acting Attorney General Jeffery Rosen in a scheme to overturn the election results in Georgia.

2 hours ago - Podcasts

Google's chief health officer Karen DeSalvo on vaccinating America

Google on Monday became the latest Big Tech company to get involved with COVID-19 vaccinations. Not just by doing things like incorporating vaccination sites into its maps, but by helping to turn some of its offices and parking lots into vaccination sites.

Axios Re:Cap goes deeper into what Google is doing, and why now, with Dr. Karen DeSalvo, Google's chief health officer who previously worked at HHS and as health commissioner for New Orleans.

Biden signs order overturning Trump's transgender military ban

Photo: Tom Brenner/Getty Images

President Biden signed an executive order on Monday overturning the Trump administration's ban on transgender Americans serving in the military.

Why it matters: The ban, which allowed the military to bar openly transgender recruits and discharge people for not living as their sex assigned at birth, affected up to 15,000 service members, according to tallies from the National Center for Transgender Equality and Transgender American Veterans Association.