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Photo Illustration by Soumyabrata Roy/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Google said Monday that it's aiming to run all its worldwide data centers and corporate campuses on 100% carbon-free power by 2030.

Why it matters: It's the latest of Big Tech's mounting climate pledges and puts a specific timeframe on Google's existing plan for its power-thirsty data centers.

  • Google says it already buys enough renewable power annually to match its total power use.
  • But as we've written about before, that doesn't mean they're never relying on fossil generation for the systems, which they now say will happen by 2030.
  • The move also comes amid activist pressure on tech giants.

What they're saying: CEO Sundar Pichai, in a blog post, said it will involve approaches like pairing wind and solar together, increasing use of battery storage, and using AI to "optimize" power demand and forecasting.

Where it stands: Pichai, as part of several new climate announcements, also said that as of today, "we have eliminated Google’s entire carbon legacy (covering all our operational emissions before we became carbon neutral in 2007) through the purchase of high-quality carbon offsets."

Go deeper: Google pledges to be carbon free as fires engulf California (FT)

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Dec 22, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Breaking down the scale of Capitol Hill's climate and energy deal

Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

The COVID-19 relief and spending deal is Capitol Hill's "most significant action on climate and energy in over a decade," according to analysis from the Rhodium Group, an emissions research firm.

Why it matters: The package now heading for President Trump's signature would phase down a potent greenhouse gases called hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) used in air conditioning and refrigeration.

Janet Yellen confirmed as Treasury secretary

Janet Yellen. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The Senate voted 84-15 to confirm Janet Yellen as Treasury secretary on Monday.

Why it matters: Yellen is the first woman to serve as Treasury secretary, a Cabinet position that will be crucial in helping steer the country out of the pandemic-induced economic crisis.

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
3 hours ago - Economy & Business

Scoop: Red Sox strike out on deal to go public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The parent company of the Boston Red Sox and Liverpool F.C. has ended talks to sell a minority ownership stake to RedBall Acquisition, a SPAC formed by longtime baseball executive Billy Beane and investor Gerry Cardinale, Axios has learned from multiple sources. An alternative investment, structured more like private equity, remains possible.

Why it matters: Red Sox fans won't be able to buy stock in the team any time soon.