Nov 27, 2018

The economic message behind GM's restructuring

Photo: Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

There was a lot behind yesterday's announcement that General Motors will idle five North American plants and lay off over 14,000 employees. American car consumer tastes shifting away from sedans? Check. Making good on a threat made when Trump first announced his tariff plans? Check. Formally establishing that GM believes electric is how future cars will be powered (despite killing off the Volt)? Check.

But the biggest takeaway here should be how GM is indirectly predicting an economic slowdown. GM, which declined to make senior executives available for interview, basically pledged coming out of bankruptcy that it would maintain profitability in good times and bad — something it has largely done. Cutting these jobs and factories now is GM's way of saying that the consumer boom-times may have peaked (or nearly peaked), and that it must conserve resources in order to realize on its electric, autonomous future.

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#MeToo gets Weinstein

A man carries out Weinstein's walker. Photo: Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

Hollywood titan Harvey Weinstein is now a convicted rapist, two years and four months after accusations against him helped ignite the #MeToo movement.

Why it matters: To date, #MeToo has resulted in hundreds of powerful men losing their jobs. Seven have been criminally convicted, with four others still facing charges.

JPMorgan Chase to pull support for some fossil fuels

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

JPMorgan Chase said Monday that it won’t directly finance new oil and gas development in the Arctic and will significantly curtail its financing of the extraction and burning of coal.

Why it matters: JPMorgan is the world’s largest funder of fossil-fuel companies, according to a report by the Rainforest Action Network (RAN). The announcement follows similar moves by other big banks and investment firms, including Goldman Sachs and BlackRock.