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A GM software test engineer. Photo: GM

General Motors is pulling ahead the launch of two future electric vehicles and plans to add 3,000 new software jobs by early next year as it races to get electric vehicles on the road faster.

Why it matters: The hiring spree is a sign that GM is accelerating its transition toward an electric future by mid-decade. It comes as President-elect Joe Biden is also talking up electric vehicles as part of his climate and energy priorities.

What's happening: In a year turned upside down by the coronavirus, GM has been developing vehicles more quickly using virtual tools, said Ken Morris, GM's vice president of autonomous and electric vehicle programs.

  • That has enabled the automaker to pull ahead two major electric vehicle programs, Morris told reporters Monday, without providing further details.
  • "We really want to advance the entire EV portfolio. That’s where we need the extra horsepower of 3,000 additional software engineers," he said.

What to watch: GM CEO Mary Barra will share more details about the accelerated pipeline at a Barclays investor event on Thursday, he said.

Details: Amid a war for technology talent, GM said many of those hired will be virtual testing and software jobs — remote positions the Detroit-based automaker could not have fathomed before the pandemic.

  • Under Barra, GM has announced an effort to increase diversity and inclusion in its workforce.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Nov 20, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Why Tesla's market cap is soaring far past GM's

Expand chart
Data: FactSet; Chart: Sara Wise/Axios

Tesla is soaring past General Motors in market capitalization — even as electric vehicles remain still a tiny slice of vehicle sales and FM's overall sales far outstrip Tesla's.

Why it matters: Tesla's enormous market value helps to show how investors see vehicles with a plug as the future, even though internal combustion vehicles will dominate for a long time to come.

Updated 28 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sen. Kelly Loeffler to return to campaign trail after 2nd negative test

Sen. Kelly Loeffler addresses supporters during a rally on Thursday. Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Sen. Kelly Loeffler's (R-Ga.) campaign announced Monday that she "looks forward to getting back out on the campaign trail" after testing negative for COVID-19 for a second time, following earlier conflicting results.

Why it matters: Loeffler has been campaigning at events ahead of a Jan. 5 runoff in elections that'll decide which party holds the Senate majority. Vice President Mike Pence was with her on Friday.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Key government agency says Biden transition can formally begin

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy. Photo: Alex Edelman/CNP/Getty Images

General Services Administrator Emily Murphy said in a letter to President-elect Joe Biden on Monday that she has determined the transition from the Trump administration can formally begin.

Why it matters: Murphy, a Trump appointee, had come under fire for delaying the so-called "ascertainment" and withholding the funds and information needed for the transition to begin while Trump's legal challenges played out.