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A view above Ellesmere Island, Canada, in 2017.

Canada's only ice shelf broke apart due to a hot summer and climate change, the AP reports.

Why it matters: Ice shelves are between hundreds and thousands of years old and bulkier than long-term sea ice. Their disappearance from Canada showcases how the Arctic has warmed faster than the rest of globe.

What they're saying: “There aren’t very many ice shelves around the Arctic anymore,” University of Ottawa glaciology professor Luke Copland told the AP.

  • “It seems we’ve lost pretty much all of them from northern Greenland and the Russian Arctic. There may be a few in a few protected fjords.”

By the numbers: Temperatures in the region have been 9 degrees warmer than the 1980-2010 average from May to early August, Copland said.

The big picture: The shelf, located on the northwestern boundary of Ellesmere Island, broke into two large icebergs that started drifting away. One is the size of Manhattan.

Go deeper: The rising seas global warming has already locked in

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
Aug 7, 2020 - Economy & Business

Intercontinental Exchange to buy mortgage software provider Ellie Mae

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Intercontinental Exchange agreed to buy Ellie Mae, a Pleasanton, Calif.-based provider of mortgage finance software, from Thoma Bravo for $11 billion.

Why it matters: This is the largest acquisition ever for Intercontinental Exchange, as it only spent $8.2 billion to buy the New York Stock Exchange in 2012. It also pushes ICE much further into the mortgage finance market, following smaller deals for MERS (2016) and Simplifile (2019).

Updated 35 mins ago - World

Mexican President López Obrador tests positive for coronavirus

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador during a press conference at National Palace in Mexico City, Mexico, on Wednesday. Photo: Ismael Rosas/Eyepix Group/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador announced Sunday evening that he's tested positive for COVID-19.

Driving the news: López Obrador tweeted that he has mild symptoms and is receiving medical treatment. "As always, I am optimistic," he added. "We will all move forward."

51 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Sarah Huckabee Sanders to run for governor of Arkansas

Sarah Huckabee Sanders at FOX News' studios in New York City in 2019. Photo: Steven Ferdman/Getty Images

Former White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders will announce Monday that she's running for governor of Arkansas.

The big picture: Sanders was touted as a contender after it was announced she was leaving the Trump administration in June 2019. Then-President Trump tweeted he hoped she would run for governor, adding "she would be fantastic." Sanders is "seen as leader in the polls" in the Republican state, notes the Washington Post's Josh Dawsey, who first reported the news.