Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State, Brian Kemp, removed approximately 107,000 people from voter rolls last year for not voting in recent elections amidst a large-scale purge that affected about half a million voters, according to an analysis by APM Reports.

Why it matters: Although it’s legal to purge voter rolls of those jailed or deceased, voting rights activists fear this kind of purge is a voter suppression tactic since minorities are more likely to be infrequent voters and often vote Democratic, according to APM Reports. In Georgia’s case specifically, this could affect Kemp’s election bid for governor since his Democratic opponent, Stacey Abrams, has been working to boost black and Hispanic turnout.

Between the lines: Those who advocate purging voter rolls often claim they are trying to prevent voter fraud, and they often believe those who haven't voted in recent elections have probably moved.

The big picture: 107,000 can sound like a small pool of voters, but President Trump's election was swayed by just over 77,000 voters.

Right now at least nine states, many of which are Republican, are purging voter rolls this way (Georgia, Ohio, Alaska, Montana, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and West Virginia), per APM Reports, but voting rights advocates fear the practice could cascade and spread to other states. The Supreme Court just this year ruled in a 5-4 decision that these kinds of purges don't violate federal law.

  • More federal voting rights lawsuits have been filed against Georgia than any other state except Texas, per APM Reports.

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Updated 37 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 33,880,896 — Total deaths: 1,012,964 — Total recoveries: 23,551,663Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 12:30 a.m. ET: 7,232,823 — Total deaths: 206,887 — Total recoveries: 2,840,688 — Total tests: 103,939,667Map.
  3. Education: School-aged children now make up 10% of all U.S COVID-19 cases.
  4. Health: Moderna says its coronavirus vaccine won't be ready until 2021
  5. Travel: CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S. waters — Airlines begin mass layoffs while clinging to hope for federal aid
  6. Business: Real-time data show economy's rebound slowing but still going.
  7. Sports: Steelers-Titans NFL game delayed after coronavirus outbreak.

CDC: 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like cases found on cruise ships in U.S.

Cruise Ships docked in April at the port at Marina Long Beach due to a no-sail order in Long Beach, in California. Photo: Apu Gomes/AFP via Getty Images

There have been at least 3,689 COVID-19 or coronavirus-like illness cases on cruise ships in U.S. waters, "in addition to at least 41 reported deaths," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said late Wednesday.

Driving the news: The CDC released the data from the period of March 1 through Sept. 29 in an emailed statement confirming the extension of a No Sail Order for cruise ships through Oct. 31, as first reported by Axios' Jonathan Swan on Tuesday in his article revealing CDC director Robert Redfield was overruled in a push to extend the order into 2021.

Ina Fried, author of Login
4 hours ago - Technology

Facebook removes Trump ads tying refugees to COVID-19

Photo Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

Facebook said Wednesday that it was removing a series of ads from President Trump's campaign that linked American acceptance of refugees with increased coronavirus risk, a connection Facebook says is without merit.

Why it matters: The ads were pulled after they received thousands of impressions and are a sign that the Trump campaign continues to test the limits of social media rules on false information.