Oct 19, 2018

Georgia's voter purging problem

Photo: Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Georgia’s Republican Secretary of State, Brian Kemp, removed approximately 107,000 people from voter rolls last year for not voting in recent elections amidst a large-scale purge that affected about half a million voters, according to an analysis by APM Reports.

Why it matters: Although it’s legal to purge voter rolls of those jailed or deceased, voting rights activists fear this kind of purge is a voter suppression tactic since minorities are more likely to be infrequent voters and often vote Democratic, according to APM Reports. In Georgia’s case specifically, this could affect Kemp’s election bid for governor since his Democratic opponent, Stacey Abrams, has been working to boost black and Hispanic turnout.

Between the lines: Those who advocate purging voter rolls often claim they are trying to prevent voter fraud, and they often believe those who haven't voted in recent elections have probably moved.

The big picture: 107,000 can sound like a small pool of voters, but President Trump's election was swayed by just over 77,000 voters.

Right now at least nine states, many of which are Republican, are purging voter rolls this way (Georgia, Ohio, Alaska, Montana, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Oklahoma, Oregon, and West Virginia), per APM Reports, but voting rights advocates fear the practice could cascade and spread to other states. The Supreme Court just this year ruled in a 5-4 decision that these kinds of purges don't violate federal law.

  • More federal voting rights lawsuits have been filed against Georgia than any other state except Texas, per APM Reports.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 716,101 — Total deaths: 33,854 — Total recoveries: 148,900.
  2. U.S.: Leads the world in cases. Total confirmed cases as of 5 p.m. ET: 136,880 — Total deaths: 2,409 — Total recoveries: 2,612.
  3. Federal government latest: The first federal prisoner to die from coronavirus was reported from a correctional facility in Louisiana on Sunday.
  4. Public health updates: Fauci says 100,000 to 200,000 Americans could die from virus.
  5. State updates: Louisiana governor says state is on track to exceed ventilator capacity by end of this week — Cuomo says Trump's mandatory quarantine comments "panicked" some people into fleeing New York
  6. World updates: Italy on Sunday reports 756 new deaths, bringing its total 10,779. Spain reports almost 840 dead, another new daily record that bring its total to over 6,500.
  7. What should I do? Answers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingQ&A: Minimizing your coronavirus risk
  8. Other resources: CDC on how to avoid the virus, what to do if you get it.

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Trump touts press briefing "ratings" as U.S. coronavirus case surge

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

President Trump sent about a half-dozen tweets on Sunday touting the high television ratings that his coronavirus press briefings have received, selectively citing a New York Times article that compared them to "The Bachelor" and "Monday Night Football."

Why it matters: The president has been holding daily press briefings in the weeks since the coronavirus pandemic was declared, but news outlets have struggled with how to cover them live — as Trump has repeatedly been found to spread misinformation and contradict public health officials.

World coronavirus updates: Total cases surge to over 700,000

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. Note: China numbers are for the mainland only and U.S. numbers include repatriated citizens and confirmed plus presumptive cases from the CDC

There are now than more than 700,000 confirmed cases of the coronavirus around the world, according to data from Johns Hopkins. The virus has now killed more than 32,000 people — with Italy alone reporting over 10,000 deaths.

The big picture: Governments around the world have stepped up public health and economic measures to stop the spread of the virus and soften the financial impact. In the U.S., now the site of the largest outbreak in the world, President Trump said Saturday he would issue a "strong" travel advisory for New York, New Jersey and parts of Connecticut.

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