Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Former Vice President Dick Cheney on "Meet the Press." Photo: William B. Plowman/NBC/NBC NewsWire via Getty Images.

Top officials who worked with late President George H.W. Bush during his long tenure in government made their rounds on this week's Sunday shows to pay tribute to his legacy.

One big quote from former Secretary of State James Baker: "Well, I think that no doubt that what he will be remembered as our most successful one-term president. And perhaps the most successful, one of the most successful presidents of all time. His presidency, while it was only four years, was extraordinarily consequential."

Former Vice President Dick Cheney discussed working for Bush and his son, George W. Bush, on NBC's "Meet the Press":

  • "Probably — well, as vice president they couldn’t fire me, so I could be a little bit more forthright in speaking. But they both — they were great guys to work for. I’m very proud of what I was able to do with both of them. The fact that I was asked to serve, those were remarkable years. And there were difficult times, no question about it, in both administrations. But it was a, well — the highlight of my career."

Baker on ABC's "This Week":

  • “Well, I’ve certainly imagined how different my life would have been had he not been my friend. You know, I never intended to get into politics or public service, George. And I was a lawyer in Houston, Texas. I was content to continue that."
  • "I lost my wife to cancer at the age of 38 and Barbara and George were the last people to come see her other than family before she died. And, George wanted — George came to me and said, 'You know, you need to take your mind off your grief, how about helping me run for the Senate here in Texas?'"

Gen. Colin Powell, who served as George H.W. Bush’s Joint Chiefs chairman on CNN's "State of the Union":

  • "You don’t see that in many organizations these days where you are free to speak. And Bush would just sit there listening and he would enjoy the dialogue."

Powell on "This Week":

  • “[Bush] knew what combat was all about. He knew that combat meant the death of people, people on your side and people on the other side. And so, he wanted to avoid a war.”

Go deeper:

Go deeper

27 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Trump revokes ethics order barring former aides from lobbying

Photo: Spencer Platt via Getty

Shortly after pardoning members of Congress and lobbyists convicted on corruption charges, President Trump revoked an executive order barring former officials from lobbying for five years after leaving his administration.

Why it matters: The order, which was signed eight days after he took office, was an attempt to fulfill his campaign promise to “drain the swamp.”

  • But with less than 12 hours left in office, Trump has now removed those limitations on his own aides.

Trump pardons former fundraiser Elliott Broidy

President Trump has pardoned Elliott Broidy, a former top Republican fundraiser who pleaded guilty late last year to conspiring to violate foreign lobbying laws as part of a campaign to sway the administration on behalf of Chinese and Malaysian interests.

Why it matters: Broidy was a deputy finance chair for the Republican National Committee early in Trump’s presidency, and attempted to leverage his influence in the Trump administration on behalf of his clients. The president's decision to pardon Broidy represents one last favor for a prominent political ally.

Trump grants flurry of last-minute pardons

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

President Trump issued 73 pardons and commuted the sentences of 70 individuals, hours from leaving office early Wednesday, hours from leaving office.

Why it matters: It's a last-minute gift to some of the president's loyalists and an evident use of executive power with only hours left of his presidency. Axios reported in December that Trump planned to grant pardons to "every person who ever talked to me."