A discontinued Hummer pickup truck. GM has yet to debut revivied electric vehicle's new look. Photo: Scott Olson/Getty Images

General Motors plans to reintroduce the Hummer to consumers as an electric pickup truck under the GMC brand, unnamed sources familiar with the matter tell the Wall Street Journal.

The big picture: The revival is a part of automakers' race to introduce more electric trucks and SUVs to the market. Tesla unveiled its version of an electric pickup dubbed the Cybertruck in November, expected to arrive by late 2021.

Background: Hummer was infamous for its poor fuel economy, but strong fan base. The model was pulled from the market due to the company's 2009 bankruptcy filing.

  • The truck is expected to go on sale in 2022 in small volumes, per WSJ.
  • NBA star LeBron James is expected to promote the vehicle in a Super Bowl commercial next month.

Go deeper: Toyota executive warns of "electrified armageddon" for auto industry

Go deeper

Dan Primack, author of Pro Rata
43 mins ago - Economy & Business

GoodRx prices IPO at $33 per share, valued at $12.7 billion

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

GoodRx, a price comparison app for prescription drugs at local pharmacies, on Tuesday night raised $1.14 billion in its IPO, Axios has learned.

By the numbers: GoodRx priced its shares at $33 a piece, above its $24-$28 per share offering range, which will give it an initial market cap of around $12.7 billion.

Updated 44 mins ago - Politics & Policy

House Democrats and Trump admin strike deal to avert government shutdown

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Capitol Hill. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call via Getty Images

The House on Tuesday passed legislation to fund the government through Dec. 11, by a vote of 359-57.

Why it matters: The bill will avert a government shutdown when funding expires in eight days. Pelosi and House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) said earlier that they hoped to hold a vote on the legislation on Tuesday evening.

Scoop: Meadows puts agencies on notice about staff shake-up

Internal government email obtained by Axios

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows told administration officials Monday to expect senior aides to be replaced at many government agencies, according to an internal email obtained by Axios.

Behind the scenes: Meadows asked the director of the White House Presidential Personnel Office John McEntee "to look at replacing the White House Liaisons (WHLs) at many of your agencies," according to the email. "John will be working with outgoing liaisons to explore other opportunities."

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