Feb 24, 2020 - Energy & Environment

G20 finance ministers note climate change risk for first time during Trump's tenure

German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz on Feb. 21 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Photo: Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images

The closing memo from the G20 finance ministers' weekend meeting points out that the multilateral Financial Stability Board is "examining the financial stability implications of climate change."

Why it matters: The brief shout-out is the first time that G20 finance officials have referenced climate in a joint communique during the Trump administration, Reuters reports.

But, but, but: Their piece and the New York Times' write-up both report that administration officials resisted stronger language about the topic.

  • "The United States blocked including climate change on a list of downside risks to global growth that had won agreement by nearly all other G20 delegates," Reuters notes.

The big picture: The White House has de-emphasized climate-related risks in addition to weakening regulations and abandoning the Paris climate deal.

  • Despite the G20 language, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin played down the inclusion of the language, per both outlets.

Go deeper: Climate change becomes a top business threat

Go deeper

Hardly anyone talks about climate change

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Politicians, corporations, the media and activists are talking about climate change more than ever — but most Americans are not.

Be smart: If you’re reading this on social media, you’re probably the exception, not the rule. Just 9% of Americans talk about climate change often, surveys by Yale and George Mason University indicate.

South Carolina exit polls: Climate change slips as top priority vs. Iowa, New Hampshire

A voter in Columbia, South Carolina. Photo: Sean Rayford/Getty Images

South Carolina's Democratic primary voters were less likely to list climate change as a top issue compared to previous nominating contests, according to the AP's VoteCast exit polls.

The big picture: Health care, climate change and the economy have been the top 3 issues in each primary to this point.

Ex-diplomats sketch out two visions of climate change in 2050

Christiana Figueres at the 2019 Web Summit. Photo: NurPhoto / Contributor

Two architects of the Paris Climate Agreement present a pair of possible scenarios for the global climate in 2050 — one in which we've met the carbon reduction targets laid out in the agreement, and one in which we've failed.

Why it matters: The authors argue that we have a decade left to pick which path the planet will take: catastrophe or hope.