German Finance Minister Olaf Scholz on Feb. 21 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Photo: Florian Gaertner/Photothek via Getty Images

The closing memo from the G20 finance ministers' weekend meeting points out that the multilateral Financial Stability Board is "examining the financial stability implications of climate change."

Why it matters: The brief shout-out is the first time that G20 finance officials have referenced climate in a joint communique during the Trump administration, Reuters reports.

But, but, but: Their piece and the New York Times' write-up both report that administration officials resisted stronger language about the topic.

  • "The United States blocked including climate change on a list of downside risks to global growth that had won agreement by nearly all other G20 delegates," Reuters notes.

The big picture: The White House has de-emphasized climate-related risks in addition to weakening regulations and abandoning the Paris climate deal.

  • Despite the G20 language, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin played down the inclusion of the language, per both outlets.

Go deeper: Climate change becomes a top business threat

Go deeper

Pompeo: Trump administration is "looking at" TikTok ban

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told Fox News' Laura Ingraham on Monday that the Trump administration is "looking at" a ban on Chinese social media app TikTok.

Why it matters: Lawmakers have long expressed fears that the Chinese government could use TikTok to harvest reams of data from Americans — and actions against the app have recently accelerated worldwide, highlighted by India's ban.

"Hamilton" is a streaming hit for Disney+

Data: Google Trends; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The debut of "Hamilton" on Disney+ last Friday sent downloads of the app soaring over the weekend.

Why it matters: With theaters closed until 2021, "Hamilton" is the biggest litmus test for whether Broadway will ever be able to successfully transition some of its iconic hits.

Wall Street is no longer betting on Trump

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Betting markets have turned decisively toward an expected victory for Joe Biden in November — and asset managers at major investment banks are preparing for not only a Biden win, but potentially a Democratic sweep of the Senate and House too.

Why it matters: Wall Street had its chips on a Trump win until recently — even in the midst of the coronavirus-induced recession and Biden's rise in the polls.