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Photo: Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images

One of the higher-profile energy topics in the primary fight has been a push by several Democrats to ban or restrict fracking, although it didn't surface at the primary debates Thursday night.

Driving the news: A new note from the data analytics firm Kayrros sizes up what a president might actually be able to do — thwart fracking on federal lands. They account for a relatively small but hardly trivial share of U.S. oil and gas production.

What they found: "Federal-land fracking does not represent an irreplaceable share of U.S. [oil] production, neither is it a footnote — thanks in part to the fact that wells on Federal leases have been punching above their weight," they note.

How it works: Their analysis shows that the New Mexico side of a key section of the booming Permian basin (which is largely in Texas) is the epicenter of fracked oil wells on federal lands.

  • Wells drilled on the New Mexico side of the Delaware basin, a subsection of the larger Permian, beginning 2018 account for 17% of U.S. production growth since then.

Meanwhile, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce yesterday released a study on the effect of some candidates' calls to ban fracking on all U.S. lands.

  • It's a goal of Sanders and Warren that would require congressional action that's very unlikely to occur.

What they're saying: The analysis, which looks at oil and natural gas production, argues it would be "catastrophic" for the economy, cost millions of jobs (4 million in 2021 alone); and send heating cost and pump prices skyward.

Go deeper: Warren's 2020 ascent sends ripples through oil industry

Go deeper

Trump's legacy is shaped by his narrow interests

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

President Trump's policy legacy is as much defined by what he's ignored as by what he's involved himself in.

The big picture: Over the past four years, Trump has interested himself in only a slim slice of the government he leads. Outside of trade, immigration, a personal war against the "Deep State" and the hot foreign policy issue of the moment, Trump has left many of his Cabinet secretaries to work without interruption, let alone direction.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: The good and bad news about antibody therapies — Fauci: Hotspots have materialized across "the entire country."
  2. World: Belgium imposes lockdown, citing "health emergency" due to influx of cases.
  3. Economy: Conference Board predicts economy won’t fully recover until late 2021.
  4. Education: Surge threatens to shut classrooms down again.
  5. Technology: The pandemic isn't slowing tech.
  6. Travel: CDC replaces COVID-19 cruise ban with less restrictive "conditional sailing order."
Bryan Walsh, author of Future
3 hours ago - Technology

AI and automation are creating a hybrid workforce

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

AI and automation are receiving a boost during the coronavirus pandemic that in the short term is creating a new hybrid workforce rather than destroying jobs outright.

The big picture: While the forces of automation and AI will eliminate some jobs and create some new ones, the vast majority will remain but be dramatically changed. The challenge for employers will be ensuring workforces are ready for the effects of technology.

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