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Former head of the Environmental Protection Agency Scott Pruitt is in talks to work as a consultant for Kentucky coal mining businessman Joseph Craft III, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: This is the first time Pruitt has made a career move since his departure from the EPA in July. Pruitt laid out his plans to develop a new consulting firm in one-on-one discussions with several executives during a Kentucky Coal Association meeting last week.

"Mr. Pruitt’s next career steps have been the source of interest particularly in Oklahoma, where he is seen as a viable candidate for the United States Senate or to be governor."
— NYT's Lisa Friedman, Hiroko Tabuchi and Eric Lipton write.

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Updated 2 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 a.m. ET: 11,093,182 — Total deaths: 525,491 — Total recoveries — 5,890,052Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7:30 a.m. ET: 2,795,163 — Total deaths: 129,437 — Total recoveries: 790,404 — Total tested: 34,213,497Map.
  3. States: ICU beds in Arizona's hot spot reach near capacity.
  4. Public health: The states where face coverings are mandatory Fauci says it has been a "very disturbing week" for the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.
  5. Economy: The economy may recover just quickly enough to kill political interest in more stimulus.

Kimberly Guilfoyle tests positive for coronavirus

Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Kimberly Guilfoyle, Donald Trump Jr.'s partner and a top fundraising official for the Trump campaign, tested positive for the coronavirus on Friday, The New York Times reports.

Why it matters: Guilfoyle is the third person in President Trump’s circle known to have contracted the coronavirus. Vice President Mike Pence's press secretary tested positive, as did a personal valet who served Trump food.

America's exceptionally uneventful Fourth of July

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Amateur fireworks and small backyard cookouts are winning the weekend as the coronavirus takes the flash out of the Fourth of July.

What's happening: Public parades and fireworks displays around much of the country are being cancelled to prevent mass gatherings where the virus could spread. Hot-dog contests and concerts will play to empty stands and virtual audiences — all while American pride treads an all-time low.