Screenshot of Ford video showing the Mustang Mach-E in the snow

Ford is circulating a new video that touts the ability of the upcoming Mustang Mach-E electric vehicle to handle tough winter conditions.

Why it matters: Reassuring drivers that electric cars can meet all their needs just as well, or better, than their internal-combustion counterparts is important for pushing them into the mainstream.

  • “People don’t think about electric vehicles in winter because there really isn’t an electric vehicle out there that satisfies the needs of an all-wheel-drive SUV in winter, and the Mach-e for the first time really does satisfy those needs,” Adam Deibler, Ford’s all-wheel-drive calibration engineer for the car, says in the four-minute clip.
  • The video shows lots of footage of the Mach-E moving around at the Smithers Winter Test Center in Michigan.

What's next: Ford plans to begin deliveries of the car late this year.

Go deeper: Ford offers more details about its "Mustang-inspired" electric SUV

Go deeper

More than 32 million Americans are receiving unemployment benefits

Photo: Jay L. Clendenin / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

More than 32 million Americans are receiving some form of unemployment benefits, according to data released by the Labor Department on Thursday.

Why it matters: Tens of millions of jobless Americans will soon have a smaller cash cushion — as coronavirus cases surge and certain parts of the country re-enter pandemic lockdowns — barring an extension of the more generous unemployment benefits that are set to expire at the end of the month.

2 hours ago - Sports

Alumni fight to save college sports

Data: Mat Talk Online; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

242 collegiate athletic programs have been cut amid the pandemic, altering the careers and lives of thousands of student-athletes.

Yes, but: Some passionate alumni groups have opted to fight, banding together in hopes of saving the programs they helped build and continue to love.

2 hours ago - World

The U.S.-China trade war quietly escalates

Photo Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photos: Alex Wong/Getty Images and Lintao Zhang/Getty Images

Lost amid headlines about the coronavirus pandemic and the seemingly unstoppable stock market rally, has been the monthslong escalation of tensions in the U.S.-China trade war —  and it's likely here to stay.

Why it matters: The tariffs continue to impress a sizable tax on U.S. companies and consumers, adding additional costs and red tape for small businesses, farmers, manufacturers and households trying to stay afloat amid the pandemic.