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Screenshot of the electric Ford F-150 from a promotional video. Courtesy of Ford

Ford is offering more info about the design and strategy around its long-awaited entry into the electric truck market, the battery-powered F-150 pickup arriving in mid-2022.

Why it matters: There's new capital coming into the increasingly competitive electric pickup race, with Tesla, Rivian and others bringing new models to market over the next couple of years.

  • Ford is spending $700 million to expand the capacity of its existing Rouge Complex to build the electric vehicle and a hybrid version of the popular F-150 line.

The intrigue: Ford is not trying to compete with Tesla or GMC's electric Hummer in the race to build something that would look at home in a sci-fi movie or a Mad Max-ified future.

  • Instead, look for something that's very recognizably a regular pickup, albeit a next-wave version.
  • “Others are aiming for lifestyle vehicles. Ours is designed and engineered for hard-working customers who want a truck to do a job,” Ford's Kumar Galhotra told reporters this week.
  • Galhotra, president of its Americas & International Markets Group, said the design is an "evolution," but will still "capture the DNA of the F-150."

How it works: They said the truck will have more horsepower and torque than any gasoline-powered F-150s, and accelerate more quickly too. They're also touting the vehicle's ability to serve as a power source.

  • "Ford will debut new technology on the electric F-150 that allows mobile power generation so customers can use their trucks as a power source for places from campsites to job sites when needed," a release states.

What to watch: The price is still outstanding.

Go deeper

Aug 14, 2020 - Economy & Business

Elon Musk is channeling Henry Ford in auto manufacturing

Photo illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios. Photo: Zhang Peng/LightRocket via Getty Images

Tesla CEO Elon Musk, who has spent more than a decade trying to disrupt the traditional auto industry, is sounding more and more like the man most closely associated with it: Henry Ford.

Why it matters: In his quest to build affordable electric cars for the masses, Musk is starting to embrace many of the ideas pioneered by Ford's founder — things like vertical supply chains and an obsession with manufacturing efficiency. A century ago that approach helped to popularize the American automobile by lowering the cost of the Model T.

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jul 2, 2020 - Energy & Environment

Why going electric makes sense for ride-hailing

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Deploying electric vehicles instead of gasoline-powered models for services like Uber and Lyft provides outsized climate benefits compared to emissions cuts from electric vehicles for only personal use, per a peer-reviewed study in Nature Energy.

Why it matters: The analysis, based on California data, follows explosive growth in ride-hailing in recent years — and evidence that it's cannibalizing more climate-friendly mass transit.

Sep 25, 2020 - Economy & Business

Eyeing the end of gas-powered cars

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Gasoline-powered cars may be going the way of the woolly mammoth, even if it will take decades to replace them and seems hard to fathom today.

The big picture: Internal combustion engines (ICEs) have powered automobiles for more than 100 years. But the shift to electric vehicles, slow to materialize at first, is now accelerating due to tightening government policies, falling costs and a societal reckoning about climate change.