Get the latest market trends in your inbox

Stay on top of the latest market trends and economic insights with the Axios Markets newsletter. Sign up for free.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Minneapolis-St. Paul

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa-St. Petersburg news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa-St. Petersburg

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Desmond Meade, president of the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, who championed the sweeping voting rights ballot measure. Photo: Erika Goldring via Getty Images

Up to 1.4 million people with felony records in Florida are now eligible to vote in elections — a historic milestone that comes two months after Floridians approved a constitutional amendment to automatically re-enfranchise those who have completed their sentences. It does not include people convicted of murder or sex crimes.

Why it matters: The ballot measure, which overturned a Jim Crow-era law and passed with nearly 65% of the vote, will enfranchise more people at once than any single initiative since the Voting Rights Act of 1965. This new voting bloc has the potential to shift the makeup of the country’s largest battleground state, where razor-thin margins often play a deciding role in presidential elections.

Background: The measure's passage set off a partisan debate about how and when the measure will be implemented. The amendment says that “voting rights shall be restored upon completion of all terms of sentence including parole or probation.”

  • However, it’s still unclear what "all terms" means. Some say former felons could be required to repay all fines and fees connected to their sentence, per local reports.
  • Republicans leaders like Gov.-elect Ron DeSantis, who oppose the measure, told the Palm Beach Post in December that it should be delayed because clarification is needed from the state legislature — which doesn't meet until March.
  • But civil and voting rights organizations argue that the initiative can go into effect without enforcement, and that critics are trying to thwart the will of voters. The American Civil Liberties Union also vowed to take legal action against efforts to undercut the measure.

Meanwhile, the Florida Rights Restoration Coalition, the grassroots group that championed the push, is orchestrating a voter education campaign to ensure that newly enfranchised Floridians exercise their voting rights.

The big picture: Only three states — Iowa, Virginia and Kentucky — continue to constitutionally prohibit ex-felons from voting unless the governor approves a clemency plea. 

  • Before the new policy went into effect, felony disenfranchisement laws affected about 6 million people nationally, according to the Sentencing Project. Florida had the most stringent laws, banning more people from voting than any other state.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Mike Allen, author of AM
13 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Why Trump may still fire Barr

Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Attorney General Barr may be fired or resign, as President Trump seethes about Barr's statement this week that no widespread voter fraud has been found.

Behind the scenes: A source familiar with the president's thinking tells Axios that Trump remains frustrated with what he sees as the lack of a vigorous investigation into his election conspiracy theories.

Mike Allen, author of AM
13 mins ago - World

Scoop: Trump's spy chief plans dire China warning

Xi Jinping reviews troops during a military parade in Beijing last year. Photo: Thomas Peter/Reuters

Director of National Intelligence John Ratcliffe on Thursday will publicly warn that China's threat to the U.S. is a defining issue of our time, a senior administration official tells Axios.

Why it matters: It's exceedingly rare for the head of the U.S. intelligence community to make public accusations about a rival power.

Ina Fried, author of Login
33 mins ago - Technology

Tech's race problem is all about power

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

As problematic as the tech industry's diversity statistics are, activists say the focus on those numbers overlooks a more fundamental problem — one less about numbers than about power.

What they're saying: In tech, they argue, decision-making power remains largely concentrated in the hands of white men. The result is an industry whose products and working conditions belie the industry rhetoric about changing the world for the better.