Third Way

The centrist think tank Third Way is publishing today a new map and database its creators say is the most comprehensive yet tracking all types of projects working to capture carbon emissions.

Why it matters: The United Nations' scientific body concluded in its most recent assessment of climate science in 2014 that if this technology isn't widely deployed, it would be 138% more expensive to keep global temperatures below a roughly 2-degree Celsius rise over the next century.

Gritty details: The database identified more than 100 projects, with just over half of them in the U.S., and most aren't about coal but other industrial processes, like cement and steel. It also includes the couple of projects around the world that capture carbon emissions from the air, not at the onset from facilities like power or industrial plants, which is more common.

The big picture: Carbon capture technology, struggling for decades to gain political relevancy and commercial scale, is suddenly getting a lot more attention from people on both the left and right. This database shows how this once-obscure technology is breaking through and going mainstream -- mainstream in energy and climate circles, anyway.

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35 mins ago - Podcasts

The art and business of political polling

The election is just eight days away, and it’s not just the candidates whose futures are on the line. Political pollsters, four years after wrongly predicting a Hillary Clinton presidency, are viewing it as their own judgment day.

Axios Re:Cap digs into the polls, and what pollsters have changed since 2016, with former FiveThirtyEight writer and current CNN politics analyst Harry Enten.

Twitter launches warnings on election misinformation and delays

Photo: courtesy of Twitter

Twitter will start pinning notices to the top of all U.S. Twitter users’ timelines warning that results in next week’s election may be delayed and that they may encounter misinformation on mail-in voting.

Why it matters: Delayed election results are expected across many states that are handling unprecedented amounts of absentee and mailed ballots, which President Trump has baselessly called "very dangerous" and "corrupt."

Miriam Kramer, author of Space
3 hours ago - Science

NASA confirms water exists on sunny parts of the Moon

Photo: NASA/JPL/USGS

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Why it matters: NASA is aiming to send people back to the Moon as part of its Artemis program by 2024, with plans to eventually create a sustainable presence on the lunar surface. That sustainability relies on mining the moon for its resources, like water.

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