Food and Drug Administration headquarters in White Oak, Md. Photo: Al Drago/CQ Roll Call

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the first-ever drug for the treatment of postpartum depression.

Why it matters: The injectable drug, to be called Zulresso, offers new hope for mothers who experience symptoms of postpartum depression after pregnancy, including feelings of sadness and anxiety that might interfere with their ability to provide their babies with care. The symptoms can be severe and even life threatening.

Details: The drug is administered as a continuous IV infusion over a total of 60 hours, per the FDA. Patients, who must remain at a certified medical center during treatment, may experience side effects, such as headache, dizziness or excessive sleepiness.

Sage Therapeutics, the company that developed the drug, confirmed to CNN that the infusion will cost between $20,000 and $30,000. It's expected to be available by late June.

Our thought bubble: As Axios' Eileen Drage O'Reilly explains, this remedy is greatly needed. But low-income women (who are more susceptible to postpartum depression) and those who lack adequate insurance coverage, are largely unable to afford both the treatment and meet the requirement to be overnight in a hospital or clinical setting for a 60-hour infusion. So, it's not exactly accessible to most people. But, it's a start.

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Updated 52 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 20,124,437 — Total deaths: 737,224 — Total recoveries: 12,373,784Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10:30 a.m. ET: 5,097,164 — Total deaths: 163,505 — Total recoveries: 1,670,755 — Total tests: 62,513,174Map.
  3. States: State testing plans fall short of demand — Bipartisan National Governors Association leaders express concern over Trump's unemployment order.
  4. Axios-Ipsos poll: 1 in 2 has a personal connection to COVID-19.
  5. Business: Moderna reveals it may not hold patent rights for vaccine.
  6. World: New Zealand reports first local cases for 102 days — Why you should be skeptical of Russia's vaccine claims.

Exclusive: Facebook cracks down on political content disguised as local news

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Facebook is rolling out a new policy that will prevent U.S. news publishers with "direct, meaningful ties" to political groups from claiming the news exemption within its political ads authorization process, executives tell Axios.

Why it matters: Since the 2016 election, reporters and researchers have uncovered over 1,200 instances in which political groups use websites disguised as local news outlets to push their point of view to Americans.

2 hours ago - Technology

Nationalism and authoritarianism threaten the internet's universality

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Governments around the world, prompted by nationalism, authoritarianism and other forces, are threatening the notion of a single, universal computer network — long the defining characteristic of the internet.

The big picture: Most countries want the internet and the economic and cultural benefits that come with it. Increasingly, though, they want to add their own rules — the internet with an asterisk, if you will. The question is just how many local rules you can make before the network's universality disappears.