Apr 24, 2017

FCC chief to unveil plan to roll back net neutrality rules

Robin Groulx / Axios

Republican FCC Chairman Ajit Pai intends to reveal a proposal this week to dismantle the legal foundation of the agency's sweeping 2015 net neutrality rules, according to four sources.

The gritty details: He'll lay make a high-level case against his predecessor's move to reclassify broadband service as a utility in a speech Wednesday, sources said. Expect him to reiterate his argument that the 2015 rules have spooked internet providers, causing them to invest less in their infrastructure.

The even grittier details: Pai's proposal would reverse the reclassification of broadband service and explore in an open-ended way how to replace the 2015 rules, according to multiple sources. After the FCC votes on the measure, the public, outside groups and companies will be able to comment on Pai's proposal in what is certain to be a contentious debate.

Those rules are best known for stopping internet providers from slowing or blocking content or providing fast lanes. Pai is said to have previously floated to industry groups the idea of having internet service providers voluntary agree not to engage in those activities, with those promises being enforced by the Federal Trade Commission.

An FCC spokesman declined to comment beyond confirming Wednesday's speech.

Go deeper

Pandemic and protests can't stop the stock market

Traders work on the floor of the NYSE. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images.

United States equities were on pace to open higher Monday following big gains in Asia and Europe and a risk-on bid in currency markets.

Why it matters: Stock markets could continue to rise despite an unprecedented global pandemic, violent protests over police violence in the U.S. not seen since the 1960s, and spiking tensions between the world's two largest economies.

2 hours ago - Sports

The sports world speaks up about death of George Floyd

Celtics guard Jaylen Brown. Screenshot: Jaylen Brown/Instagram

There was a time when a months-long sports absence would have silenced athletes, leaving them without a platform to reach fans or make their voices heard.

Why it matters: But now that athletes boast massive social media followings and no longer need live game broadcasts or media outlets to reach millions, they're speaking out en masse amid protests over the death of George Floyd and other police-related killings of black people — delivering messages of frustration and unity, despite their leagues not currently operating.

The technology of witnessing brutality

Charging Alabama state troopers pass by fallen demonstrators in Selma on March 7, 1965. Photo: Bettmann/Getty Images

The ways Americans capture and share records of racist violence and police misconduct keep changing, but the pain of the underlying injustices they chronicle remains a stubborn constant.

Driving the news: After George Floyd's death at the hands of Minneapolis police sparked wide protests, Minnesota Gov. Tim Walz said, “Thank God a young person had a camera to video it."