Dec 2, 2017

FBI agent removed from Mueller's team for sending anti-Trump texts

Robert Mueller. Photo: J. Scott Applewhite / AP

A top FBI agent, Peter Strzok, was removed from Bob Mueller's Russia investigation team last summer after reportedly sending text messages "that expressed anti-Trump political views," according to the New York Times.

Why it matters: Strzok "is considered one of the most experienced and trusted FBI counterintelligence investigators," per the Times. He previously played a big role in the investigation of Hillary Clinton's emails.

What happened: Mueller removed him after a discovery of texts in which Strzok and a colleague — Lisa Page, who served on Mueller's team until July — were reacting to current events in ways that could be construed as "critical" of the president. He's been reassigned to the human resources department of the FBI.

Per Washington Post: "Defenders of Page and Strzok insisted the issue is 'overblown'' and that there was no misconduct between the two."

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More states issue stay-at-home orders as coronavirus crisis escalates

Data: Axios reporting; Map: Danielle Alberti/Axios

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan, Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam and District of Columbia Mayor Muriel Bowser issued stay-at-home orders on Monday, with exceptions for residents engaged in essential services, including health care and government functions. Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced a similar directive on Monday evening.

The big picture: The states and territory are the latest to announce policies to enforce social distancing, which have affected almost 250 million Americans. More than 1.5 billion people worldwide had been asked to stay home as of last week.

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U.S. coronavirus updates: 3 out of 4 Americans forced to stay home

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

At least 30 state governors and the District to Columbia have ordered their residents to stay home to promote social distancing and limit community spread from the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: Those states account for about 3/4 of the American population, the N.Y. Times notes. More cities like Boston, Detroit, New Orleans and Philadelphia, are reporting an influx of cases, prompting states to take stronger actions.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 39 mins ago - Health

America under lockdown

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

If you thought March felt like the longest month in American history, just wait for April and May, when people will be forced to witness spring from the indoors.

The big picture: 28 states are in or entering lockdown, with Maryland and Virginia joining those ranks today. So is D.C., as its mayor made official this afternoon. Those states include roughly 3/4 of the American people, the N.Y. Times notes.

Go deeperArrow41 mins ago - Health