Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Lynne Chou O'Keefe, a former partner at Kleiner Perkins, has launched a new venture capital firm called Define Ventures that will focus on early-stage digital health companies. She also raised $87 million for the firm's debut fund.

Why it matters: Digital health is a growing area, with Define to focus on such sub-sectors as telemedicine, clinical research databases, and chronic condition management.

Yes, but: Digital Health still needs to prove itself.

  • Livongo Health, on whose board Chou O'Keefe spent four years before it went public last July, is now trading below its IPO stock price. So is Health Catalyst, another company that recently went public, though there are some small successes like Progyny, which bundles fertility benefits for employers and is profitable.
  • Chou O'Keefe acknowledges that telemedicine isn't the panacea the tech industry thought it would be for health care—in some cases, patients need a lot of in-person interactions with their doctors.

Go deeper: Health care IPOs had a very good 2019

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Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

While its Big Tech rivals were testifying in front of a congressional antitrust committee last week, Microsoft was negotiating what could be the largest — and most politically perilous — tech acquisition of 2020.

The state of play: The hullabaloo surrounding Microsoft picking up TikTok has undergone a flurry of twists and turns over the weekend, as both the White House and the tech giant reacted in real time.

XFL sold to group that includes Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson for $15 million

Photo: Abbie Parr/Getty Images

The XFL sold Monday for $15 million to a group that includes former WWE star Dwayne "The Rock" Johnson, Sportico reports.

The state of play: The move does not necessarily mean the upstart football league is returning.

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Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

A group of Pac-12 football players have threatened to opt out of the season unless the conference addresses systemic inequities and concerns related to the coronavirus pandemic.

Why it matters: College football players have never had more leverage than they do right now, as the sport tries to stage a season amid the pandemic. And their willingness to use it shows we've entered a new age in college sports.