European Commission President Ursula Von Der Leyen. Photo: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images

An interesting Bloomberg piece compares the European Union's newly unveiled climate proposals with the Green New Deal that's in vogue in American progressive circles on the left.

The intrigue: There's a lot there, but at one point the authors wonder whether the multitopic focus of the Green New Deal — which tackles health care, job and wage guarantees — will make it tougher to implement than the European Green Deal.

The big picture: The piece looks at the European goal of achieving net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. "Even ultra-conservative European governments, such as Poland’s, which resisted committing themselves to Green Deal goals, didn’t object to the bloc striving to meet the objective," they report.

  • The story notes that while even modest climate efforts have faced hostility from conservative in Congress, the GND's scope may be making its path even harder.
  • "[T]he Green New Deal’s very broad ambition has made it a favorite target of Republicans, who have tried to cast it as an illustration of how their liberal opponents are both dangerous and laughably unrealistic," it states.

Of note: There's no single Green New Deal, so Bloomberg uses a mashup of concepts in the congressional resolution and plans from Democratic White House hopefuls.

One big question: Will senior Capitol Hill Democrats, as they start preparing climate legislation that would be ready if the party regains control of Washington, take their cues from the Green New Deal's breadth?

  • I put that question to the Democratic spokesperson for the House Select Committee on the Climate Crisis, which is due to produce policy ideas by March 31. The answer was ... vague.
  • "Since climate change affects every aspect of our economy, we intend to provide recommendations that will allow Congress to address the climate crisis comprehensively," Melvin Felix said.

Go deeper: Europe's big climate deal exempts coal-reliant Poland

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Americans reflect on Independence Day amid racism reckoning

A Black Lives Matter banner and a United States flag on the facade of the U.S. embassy building in Seoul, South Korea. Photo: Simon Shin/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

America's leaders are rethinking how they view Independence Day, as the country reckons with the historic, unequal treatment of people of color during a pandemic which has disproportionately affected nonwhite Americans.

Why it matters: The country’s legacy of racism has come into sharp focus in the weeks of protests following the death of George Floyd while in Minneapolis police custody. From Confederate statues to Mount Rushmore, Americans are reexamining the symbols and traditions they elevate and the history behind them.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 10,945,600 — Total deaths: 523,035 — Total recoveries — 5,797,206Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 2 p.m. ET: 2,767,669 — Total deaths: 128,951 — Total recoveries: 781,970 — Total tested: 33,462,181Map.
  3. Public health: The states where face coverings are mandatory Fauci says it has been a "very disturbing week" for the spread of the coronavirus in the U.S.
  4. Economy: The economy may recover just quickly enough to kill political interest in more stimulus.
  5. States: Florida reports more than 10,000 new coronavirus cases, and its most-infected county issues curfew.
6 hours ago - Sports

Washington Redskins to review team name amid public pressure

Photo: Patrick McDermott/Getty Images

The Washington Redskins have announced they will be conducting a review of the team's name after mounting pressure from the public and corporate sponsors.

Why it matters: This review is the first formal step the Redskins are taking since the debate surrounding the name first began. It comes after weeks of discussions between the team and the NFL, the team said.