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Equifax announces 2.4 million more Americans affected in breach

Equifax logo.
Photo: Jaap Arriens / NurPhoto via Getty Images

Equifax announced Thursday that 2.4 million additional Americans were impacted in the credit reporting agency's 2017 cybersecurity breach. That brings the total number of Americans affected to about 147.9 million in the largest data breach of personal information in history.

The big picture: The newly announced 2.4 million had less vital personal information exposed — their names and partial driver’s license numbers. The original 145.5 million had their Social Security numbers stolen, which can be significantly more damaging in potential identity theft.

The big thing: This new revelation shows how Americans can still be left in the dark about whether their personal information is secure after a data breach — even months after an incident occurs — potentially leaving them vulnerable to identity theft and its related headaches for years to come.

The investigations:

The details for those newly affected:

  • Equifax found the additional 2.4 million exposures by cross-referencing names and partial driver’s license numbers with internal and external data sources.
  • The newly announced 2.4 million will receive the same credit monitoring and identity theft protection Equifax offered those who were alerted in the initial announcement.
Dave Lawler 8 hours ago
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What Trump and Putin did and didn't discuss

President Trump spoke with Vladimir Putin this afternoon, and congratulated him on winning re-election on Sunday. After the call, Press Secretary Sarah Sanders was asked whether Trump felt the election had been free and fair, and said it wasn’t up to the U.S. to “dictate" how Russia holds elections.

The bottom line: Trump is not alone in congratulating Putin — leaders in France, Germany and elsewhere have done so this week, as Barack Obama did in 2012. But past administrations certainly have seen it as America’s role to call balls and strikes when it comes to elections abroad, and weigh in when democratic institutions are being undermined. A departure from that approach would be welcomed not only by Putin, but other leaders of pseudo democracies around the world.

Haley Britzky 6 hours ago
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The strange saga of Ben Carson and his table

Ben Carson.
Secretary Ben Carson. Photo: Aaron P. Bernstein / Getty Images

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson has been in hot water in recent weeks over reports that he ordered a $31,000 dining set for his office using taxpayer dollars. His latest explanation, on Tuesday: "I left it to my wife."

The bigger picture: Carson joins other cabinet officials who have been scrutinized for seemingly lavish spending. From a cost standpoint, his case is far from the most eye-popping — but it includes some particularly interesting twists and turns.