Emissions from a coal fired power plant in Utah. Photo: George Frey/Getty Images

The Environmental Protection Agency estimates that there would be between 470 and 1,400 additional premature annual deaths by 2030 under its new coal plant regulations.

The details: The estimate comes in the EPA's proposal for governing coal-burning power plants. The particles are part of particulate pollution (PM 2.5) that is emitted from coal-burning plants; the EPA says on its website that these can cause things like asthma, decreased lung function, and "premature death in people with heart or lung disease."

The administration's plan differs from the Obama administration's Clean Power plan, which would have reduced greenhouse gas emissions from power plants by up to 32% by 2030.

  • The administration says their plan will "achieve many of the benefits sought by the Obama administration but in a way that is legal and allows states greater flexibility," the NYT reports.
  • Acting EPA Administrator Andrew Wheeler said, per The Times: "Today’s proposal provides the states and regulated community the certainty they need to continue environmental progress while fulfilling President Trump’s goal of energy dominance."

The EPA's full report:

Go deeper

Column / Harder Line

How Europe’s green pandemic recovery will push the rest of the world

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Europe, long the most progressive continent when it comes to tackling climate change, is doubling down on this ambition to revive pandemic-ravaged economies.

Why it matters: The European Union is the world’s third-largest emitting region after the U.S. and China, but it’s not just that. These plans will push global corporate behavior and prod other governments by creating either templates to follow or protectionist battles (or both).

Updated 10 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 12,859,834 — Total deaths: 567,123 — Total recoveries — 7,062,085Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 3,297,501— Total deaths: 135,155 — Total recoveries: 1,006,326 — Total tested: 40,282,176Map.
  3. States: Florida smashes single-day record for new coronavirus cases with over 15,000 — NYC reports zero coronavirus deaths for first time since pandemic hit.
  4. Public health: Ex-FDA chief projects "apex" of South's coronavirus curve in 2-3 weeks — Coronavirus testing czar: Lockdowns in hotspots "should be on the table"
  5. Education: Betsy DeVos says schools that don't reopen shouldn't get federal funds — Pelosi accuses Trump of "messing with the health of our children."

Scoop: How the White House is trying to trap leakers

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's chief of staff, Mark Meadows, has told several White House staffers he's fed specific nuggets of information to suspected leakers to see if they pass them on to reporters — a trap that would confirm his suspicions. "Meadows told me he was doing that," said one former White House official. "I don't know if it ever worked."

Why it matters: This hunt for leakers has put some White House staffers on edge, with multiple officials telling Axios that Meadows has been unusually vocal about his tactics. So far, he's caught only one person, for a minor leak.