Sep 23, 2018

GM alters executive structure amid electric vehicles push

A Chevy Bolt. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

General Motors is overhauling its electric vehicle management with several internal moves as the automaker works to have 20 EV models launched worldwide by 2023.

Why it matters: The moves signal increased focus on EVs by major automakers — even though they hold only a tiny share of the market today.

Driving the news: Pam Fletcher will take the newly created position of VP for innovation that reports directly to CEO Mary Barra, GM said. She's currently the VP of global electric vehicle programs.

  • Doug Parks, who is the VP for autonomous and electric vehicle programs, "will also assume primary responsibility for the growing global electric vehicle team," GM tells Axios.
  • And Mike Ableson, who is currently VP for global strategy, will become VP for electric vehicle charging and infrastructure, reporting to Parks in the newly created role.
  • The changes were first reported by Automotive News.

The details: Parks, in a statement, said Ableson will "develop the partnerships, incentives and investments needed to create the necessary electric vehicle charging infrastructure to remove a critical barrier to acceptance of electrification."

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Coronavirus kills 2 Diamond Princess passengers and South Korea sees first death

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, the CDC, and China's Health Ministry. U.S. numbers include Americans extracted from Princess Cruise ship.

Two elderly Diamond Princess passengers have been killed by the novel coronavirus — the first deaths confirmed among the more than 600 infected aboard the cruise ship. South Korea also announced its first death Thursday.

The big picture: COVID-19 has now killed more than 2,200 people and infected over 75,465 others, mostly in mainland China, where the National Health Commission announced 118 new deaths since Thursday.

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SoftBank to cut its stake to get T-Mobile's Sprint deal done

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

T-Mobile and Sprint announced a revised merger agreement that will see SoftBank getting a smaller share of the combined company, while most shareholders will receive the previously agreed upon exchange rate. The companies said they hope to get the deal as early as April 1.

Why it matters: The amended deal reflects the decline in Sprint's business, while leaving most shareholders' stake intact and removing another hurdle to the deal's closure.