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Reproduced from Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy; Chart: Axios Visuals

Electric vehicle sales have taken off over the last decade, and full electrics have overtaken plug-in hybrids over the last five years, according to the Energy Department's handy transportation "fact of the week" series.

Why it matters: Electric vehicles are growing, but still represent a tiny share of the roughly 17 million-plus passenger vehicles sold annually in the U.S. (a number dropping this year because of the pandemic).

  • Even in California, the biggest electric vehicle market, cars with a plug were around 8% of new sales last year.

Between the lines: For advocates of electric cars and cutting carbon emissions, that could be viewed as encouraging, daunting, or both.

What we're watching: The angle of that upward line. Joe Biden, if he wins, hopes to juice electric vehicle sales with investments in charging infrastructure and expanded vehicle tax credits (among other things).

  • Automakers, for their part, are bringing a suite of new models to market, and as noted in the item above, the fate of state efforts will matter too.

Go deeper: Eyeing the end of gas-powered cars

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
Jan 6, 2021 - Energy & Environment

What it will take to electrify ride-hailing

Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

There's good news and bad news when it comes to curbing carbon emissions from Uber, Lyft and other ride-hailing services, courtesy of new analysis from the Rocky Mountain Institute.

Why it matters: Ride-hailing creates new emissions challenges.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
23 mins ago - Health

Who benefits from Biden's move to reopen ACA enrollment

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Nearly 15 million Americans who are currently uninsured are eligible for coverage on the Affordable Care Act marketplaces, and more than half of them would qualify for subsidies, according to a new Kaiser Family Foundation brief.

Why it matters: President Biden is expected to announce today that he'll be reopening the marketplaces for a special enrollment period, but getting a significant number of people to sign up for coverage will likely require targeted outreach.

1 hour ago - Technology

Big Tech bolts politics

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

Big Tech fed politics. Then it bled politics. Now it wants to be dead to politics. 

Why it matters: The social platforms that profited massively on politics and free speech suddenly want a way out — or at least a way to hide until the heat cools.