Protestors in Quito, Ecuador, on Oct. 8. Photo: Jonatan Rosas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The turmoil in Ecuador is a fresh example of why fossil fuel subsidies are so persistent worldwide: There's support for phasing them out in theory, but in practice it's a different story.

Driving the news: President Lenín Moreno this week said he has temporarily moved government operations from the capital city, Quito, to the port city of Guayaquil.

  • This comes several days after Moreno announced the termination of roughly $1.4 billion in annual fuel subsidies, causing gasoline and diesel prices to rise sharply and playing a role in triggering violent protests.

Quick take: While I'm not an expert in Ecuadorian politics, it's hard not to see a connection here to protests earlier this year in France over an increase in the gasoline tax amongst other things.

  • This helpful Bloomberg explainer on Ecuador makes the same point about removal of decades-old subsidies there.
  • "Fuel price rises have a long history of provoking unrest not just in Latin America but around the globe — a gas tax increased sparked the Yellow Vest movement in France," they report.

Where it stands: AP reports that protestors have "seized some oil installations" as part of the wider demonstrations, and that the state oil company warned that lost production could reach 165,000 barrels per day.

  • "The government declared an overnight curfew around key state installations and government buildings as well as vital infrastructure such as airports and oil refineries," they report.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  6. World: Unrest in Italy as restrictions grow across Europe.
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Updated 29 mins ago - World

In photos: Unrest in Italy as coronavirus restrictions grow across Europe

An anti-government demonstration against the economic consequences of the new measures in Turin, Italy, where luxury stores were "ransacked," on Oct. 26, the Guardian reports. Photo: Diego Puletto/Getty Images

Protests in Italy against fresh COVID-19 pandemic restrictions that came into effect Monday descended into violence in Milan and and Turin, where police used tear gas to disperse demonstrators, per the Guardian.

The big picture: The protests in Italian cities still reeling from the first lockdown mark some of the biggest resistance against measures seen yet as restrictions return across Europe, which is facing a second coronavirus wave. From Denmark to Romania, this is what's been happening, in photos.

Republicans and Dems react to Coney Barrett's Supreme Court confirmation

President Trump stands with Judge Amy Coney Barrett after she took the constitutional oath to serve as a Supreme Court justice during a White House ceremony Monday night .Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

President Trump said Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Senate confirmation to the Supreme Court and her subsequent taking of the constitutional oath Monday was a "momentous day," as she she vowed to serve "without any fear or favour."

  • But as Republicans applauded the third conservative justice in four years, many Democrats including Speaker Nancy Pelosi (Calif.) warned of consequences to the rush to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg ahead of the Nov. 3 election, with progressives leading calls to expand the court.