Protestors in Quito, Ecuador, on Oct. 8. Photo: Jonatan Rosas/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

The turmoil in Ecuador is a fresh example of why fossil fuel subsidies are so persistent worldwide: There's support for phasing them out in theory, but in practice it's a different story.

Driving the news: President Lenín Moreno this week said he has temporarily moved government operations from the capital city, Quito, to the port city of Guayaquil.

  • This comes several days after Moreno announced the termination of roughly $1.4 billion in annual fuel subsidies, causing gasoline and diesel prices to rise sharply and playing a role in triggering violent protests.

Quick take: While I'm not an expert in Ecuadorian politics, it's hard not to see a connection here to protests earlier this year in France over an increase in the gasoline tax amongst other things.

  • This helpful Bloomberg explainer on Ecuador makes the same point about removal of decades-old subsidies there.
  • "Fuel price rises have a long history of provoking unrest not just in Latin America but around the globe — a gas tax increased sparked the Yellow Vest movement in France," they report.

Where it stands: AP reports that protestors have "seized some oil installations" as part of the wider demonstrations, and that the state oil company warned that lost production could reach 165,000 barrels per day.

  • "The government declared an overnight curfew around key state installations and government buildings as well as vital infrastructure such as airports and oil refineries," they report.

Go deeper

Axios-Ipsos poll: One in two has a personal connection to the virus

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

We've hit a tipping point in the pandemic: Half of Americans now know someone who's tested positive, according to this week's installment of the Axios-Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: In practical terms, this data shows it's everybody's problem now.

Seattle police chief to resign as council votes for department cuts

A "Defund the Police" march in Seattle, Washington, on Aug. 5. Photo: Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Seattle Police Chief Carmen Best has written a resignation letter, effective Sept 2., as the city's council voted to cut the police budget Monday night, KING-TV first reported.

Why it matters: Best is Seattle's first Black police chief, AP notes. The council voted to reduce the $409 million annual police budget by $3.5 million for the rest of the year, cut about 100 officers' jobs from the 1,400-strong department and invest $17 million in "community public safety programs," Reuters reports. The one council member to vote against the changes said the action "does not do enough to defund the police," per AP.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 20,092,855 — Total deaths: 736,254 Total recoveries — 12,350,879Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 3 a.m. ET: 5,094,565 — Total deaths: 163,465 — Total recoveries: 1,670,755 — Total tests: 62,513,174Map.
  3. Politics: Trump claims he would have not called for Obama to resign over 160,000 virus deathsHouse will not hold votes until Sept. 14 unless stimulus deal is reached.
  4. Business: Richer Americans are more comfortable eating out.
  5. Public health: 5 states set single-day coronavirus case records last week — A dual coronavirus and flu threat is set to deliver a winter from hell.
  6. Sports: The cost of kids losing gym class — College football is on the brink.
  7. World: Europe's CDC recommends new restrictions amid "true resurgence in cases."