Mar 22, 2018

Dow point loss is among worst of all time

The Dow Jones Industrial Average on Thursday suffered its fifth-worst point loss of all time, although it didn't register in the top ten for percentage loss.

Bigger picture: The Dow is now down for the year, as are the NASDAQ Composite and S&P 500.

Data: Yahoo! Finance; Chart: Axios Visuals

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A decline in business lending shows the impact of manufacturing's struggles

Data: Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis; Chart: Axios Visuals

U.S. commercial and industrial lending fell by $9 billion in December, the largest drop in nearly three years, and the total amount of C&I loans declined to levels last seen in May, data from the St. Louis Fed shows.

Why it matters: The decline in lending to commercial and industrial businesses is the latest sign that the recession in U.S. manufacturing and continued struggles in goods-producing sectors of the economy are spreading. The Commerce Department reported that U.S. business investment had contracted for six straight months as of the third quarter, and had the biggest drop since the end of 2015 in Q3.

Go deeper: Manufacturing should bounce back in 2020

Keep ReadingArrowJan 15, 2020

Judge orders Alex Jones and InfoWars to pay $100,000 in Sandy Hook case

Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images.

A Texas judge ordered conspiracy theorist Alex Jones and his website InfoWars on Monday to pay $100,000 in court costs and legal fees in a case brought forward by a Sandy Hook family, the Daily Beast reports.

Catch up quick: Jones has repeatedly spread unsubstantiated conspiracies about the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre, in which 26 people died, including 20 children. Multiple families affected by the tragedy have sued Jones over the circulations.

Go deeperArrowDec 31, 2019

2019 stock market gains still leave Trump behind his predecessors

Data: FactSet; Chart: Axios Visuals

The S&P 500 has jumped 42% under President Trump — according to market data from the inauguration through 2019's final day of trading.

Why it matters: Trump uses the stock market's surge as a barometer of his presidency's success — one that, along with the 50-year low unemployment rate, he's sure to continue to tout as the 2020 election approaches — but the gains under him lag those under former Presidents Barack Obama, when stocks rebounded from the lows of the financial crisis, and George H.W. Bush.