Jan 2, 2020

Denmark generated almost half of its electricity from wind in 2019

Wind turbines in the Baltic Sea. Photo: Patrick Pleul/picture alliance via Getty Images

Wind power accounted for a record 47% of the electricity consumed in Denmark in 2019, up from 41% in 2018 and 43% in 2017, Reuters reports.

Why it matters: The country’s grid operator Energinet said Thursday that cost reductions and improved offshore turbines contributed to the boost.

Context: Denmark started investing in wind technology in the 1970s, has favorable windy conditions and is home to turbine producer Vestas and Orsted, the world’s largest developer of offshore wind farms.

The big picture: European countries are the world's leading producers of wind power. Denmark generates the most wind power, followed by Ireland, which sourced 28% of its power from wind in 2018, according to WindEurope.

What's next: Denmark hopes to curb its greenhouse gas emissions by 70% and source 100% of its electricity from renewable sources by 2030.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Wind and solar dominate new U.S. power capacity

Reproduced from EIA; Chart: Axios Visuals

Wind and solar make up more than three-quarters of the electricity capacity coming online in the country this year, new U.S. Energy Information Administration data show. 

Why it matters: These two renewable sources of energy are increasingly becoming cost-competitive, even while government subsidies for them are lessening, compared to traditionally dominant sources, such as natural gas and coal.

Go deeperArrowJan 15, 2020

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions fell by estimated 2.1% in 2019

Power lines in California in 2019. Photo: Jane Tyska/MediaNews Group/The Mercury News via Getty Images

U.S. greenhouse gas emissions fell by 2.1% in 2019 due to a decrease in national coal consumption, according to estimates from the Rhodium Group released Tuesday.

Why it matters: Power generated from coal plants fell by a record 18%, and overall emissions from the power section declined by almost 10% — despite an increase in emissions from natural gas.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

Big Tech data centers probably aren't a climate change time bomb

Data: Reproduced from an International Energy Agency report; Chart: Axios Visuals

An International Energy Agency analysis pushes back against concerns that data centers are a ticking carbon bomb as use of web-connected devices expands.

Where it stands: Power use by data centers consumes about 1% of global power (which isn't trivial in a world of still-rising emissions) and has changed little since 2015, they report.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020