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Illustration: Rebecca Zisser/Axios

The AFL-CIO, a key part of the Democratic coalition, says it wants to go big on climate change. But its policy goals don't always line up with other parts of the left.

Driving the news: The labor federation and the nonprofit Energy Futures Initiative yesterday unveiled a "framework for good jobs in a low-carbon future."

  • The 10 pillars of the plan have plenty of things that labor and climate activists agree on.
  • Think, for instance, bolstering the domestic offshore wind supply chain; expanded investments in building efficiency; and policy reforms to build out the transmission needed to bring renewables to urban areas.

Yes, but: Some aspects of the plan won't sit especially well with the left flank of the green movement (I put it that way because climate activists have a wide range of views).

  • It sees a substantial continuing role for natural gas in ways "consistent with meeting climate goals." But many activists are pushing to phase down gas production and use as quickly as possible.
  • More broadly, it makes the case for more aggressive efforts to develop and deploy carbon capture, utilization, and sequestration technologies.
  • It makes several arguments for the tech, which faces skepticism and even hostility among some activists who oppose fossil fuels.
  • For instance, it calls it a needed to decarbonize high-emitting industries like steel, pulp and paper, cement and more.

Go deeper: The Washington Examiner has more on the plan from the AFL-CIO and EFI, which is led by Obama-era energy secretary Ernest Moniz.

Go deeper

Amy Harder, author of Generate
Dec 18, 2020 - Energy & Environment

How to judge America’s climate-change responsibility

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Historically, America has emitted the most greenhouse gases of any country in the world. But over the next 80 years, the U.S. may account for as little as 5% of such emissions.

Why it matters: Installing technologies to address climate change will, therefore, be most critical in places other than America where emissions’ growth is expected to be higher, according to physicist Varun Sivaram.

Republicans pledge to set aside differences and work with Biden

President Biden speaks to Sen. Mitch McConnell after being sworn in at the West Front of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday. Photo: Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images

Several Republicans praised President Biden's calls for unity during his inaugural address on Wednesday and pledged to work together for the benefit of the American people.

Why it matters: The Democrats only have a slim majority in the Senate and Biden will likely need to work with the GOP to pass his legislative agenda.

The Biden protection plan

Joe Biden announces his first run for the presidency in June 1987. Photo: Howard L. Sachs/CNP/Getty Images

The Joe Biden who became the 46th president on Wednesday isn't the same blabbermouth who failed in 1988 and 2008.

Why it matters: Biden now heeds guidance about staying on task with speeches and no longer worries a gaffe or two will cost him an election. His staff also limits the places where he speaks freely and off the cuff. This Biden protective bubble will only tighten in the months ahead, aides tell Axios.